Evaluation of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Debulking Followed by Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy in Women with Stage III and IV Epithelial Ovarian, Fallopian Tube or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

It is well known that intraperitoneal (IP) chemotherapy prolongs survival in optimally cytoreduced (or debulked) ovarian cancer patients.  For patients who can not be optimally debulked, it is possible to administer neoadjuvant chemotherapy to place that patient in a position to be optimally debulked (i.e., 1 cm or less of residual disease post surgery) , thereby allowing the use of post-surgery IP chemotherapy (assuming optimal cytoreduction is achieved through surgery). This theory was tested in a Phase II clinical study (S0009) conducted by the Southwest Oncology Group (SOG). …

It is well known that intraperitoneal (IP) chemotherapy prolongs survival in optimally cytoreduced (or debulked) ovarian cancer patients.  For patients who can not be optimally debulked, it is possible to administer neoadjuvant chemotherapy to place that patient in a position to be optimally debulked (i.e., 1 cm or less of residual disease post surgery) , thereby allowing the use of post-surgery IP chemotherapy (assuming optimal cytoreduction is achieved through surgery). This theory was tested in a Phase II clinical study (S0009) conducted by the Southwest Oncology Group (SOG).

In SOG Study S009, researchers sought to evaluate overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), percentage of patients optimally debulked, and toxicity in Stage III/IV ovarian cancer patients treated with this strategy.

As part of the study, women with stage III/IV (pleural effusions only in stage IV) epithelial ovarian cancer, and fallopian tube or primary peritoneal carcinoma that presented with bulky disease were treated with neoadjuvant intravenous (IV) paclitaxel and carboplatin.  If, after neoadjuvant IV chemotherapy, the patient experienced a 50% or greater decrease in her CA125 tumor marker, cytoreduction surgery was performed.  If optimal debulking was achieved, the patient received IV paclitaxel, IP carboplatin and IP paclitaxel post-surgery.

The results of the study are set forth below.

  • 62 patients were registered for the study, of which four were ineligible.
  • 56 patients were evaluated for neoadjuvant chemotherapy toxicities. One patient died of pneumonia. Five patients had grade 4 toxicity, including neutropenia, anemia, leukopenia, anorexia, fatigue, muscle weakness, respiratory infection, and cardiac ischemia.
  • 36 patients received debulking surgery, and two patients had grade 4 hemorrhage.
  • 26 patients received post-cytoreduction chemotherapy. Four had grade 4 neutropenia.
  • At a median follow-up of 21 months, median PFS is 21 months and median OS is 32 months for all 58 patients.
  • PFS and OS for the 26 patients who received IV/IP chemotherapy is 29 and 34 months, respectively

The researchers performing the study concluded that the results compare favorably with other studies of sub-optimally debulked (i.e., >1 cm of residual disease post surgery) patients.

Primary SourcePhase II evaluation of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and debulking followed by intraperitoneal chemotherapy in women with stage III and IV epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube or primary peritoneal cancer: Southwest Oncology Group Study S0009; Tiersten AD, Liu PY, Smith HO et. al., Gynecol Oncol. 2009 Mar;112(3):444-9. Epub 2009 Jan 12.

One thought on “Evaluation of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Debulking Followed by Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy in Women with Stage III and IV Epithelial Ovarian, Fallopian Tube or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  1. Hello!
    Very Interesting post! Thank you for such interesting resource!
    PS: Sorry for my bad english, I’v just started to learn this language ;)
    See you!
    Your, Raiul Baztepo

    Like

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