“Dose Dense” Administration of Paclitaxel and Carboplatin Increases Progression Free and Overall Survival in Ovarian Cancer Patients – Is There a New Standard of Care?

“A recent Phase III clinical trial reported that dose dense administration of paclitaxel and carboplatin increased progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) of ovarian cancer patients when compared to the conventional dose administration of those same drugs. The clinical trial results were reported by the Japanese Gynecologic Oncology Group (JGOG) at the 2008 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting held in Chicago, Illinois on May 30th through June 3, 2008.

A recent Phase III clinical trial reported that dose dense administration of paclitaxel and carboplatin increased progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) of ovarian cancer patients when compared to the conventional dose administration of those same drugs. The clinical trial results were reported by the Japanese Gynecologic Oncology Group (JGOG) at the 2008 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting held in Chicago, Illinois on May 30th through June 3, 2008.

The administration of paclitaxel (Taxol™) and carboplatin (Paraplatin™) (referred to as “c-TC”) every three weeks is considered the standard of care for the treatment of ovarian cancer. The clinical trial compared the c-TC with dose dense weekly administration with TC (referred to as “dd-TC”) as first-line chemotherapy for stage II-IV epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube or primary peritoneal cancer. The patients in the trial were randomly assigned to receive carboplatin with either (i) paclitaxel at 180 mg/m² on day 1 (conventional) or (ii) paclitaxel at 80 mg/m² on days 1, 8, and 15 (dose dense). The treatments were repeated every 3 weeks for six cycles; in responding patients, three additional cycles were administered. The primary goal of the trial was to determine patient PFS.

Of 637 patients who underwent randomization, 631 were eligible to participate in the trial. After median follow-up of 29 months, the median duration of PFS in the c-TC group and dd-TC group was 17.1 and 27.9 months, respectively, and overall survival at 2 years was 77.7% and 83.6%, respectively. Among 282 patients with measurable disease, the objective response rates were 53.3% and 55.8% in the c-TC and dd- TC groups respectively. Grade 3 and 4 anemia was reported more frequently in the dd-TC group, and other toxicities were similar in both groups. Based on these findings, the trial investigators concluded that the dd-TC improves PFS as compared with c-TC in patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer.

[Source: Randomized phase III trial of conventional paclitaxel and carboplatin (c-TC) versus dose dense weekly paclitaxel and carboplatin (dd-TC) in women with advanced epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer: Japanese Gynecologic Oncology; S. Isonishi et. al., J. Clin. Oncol. 26: 2008 (May 20 suppl; abstr 5506).]

Comment: It is likely that “dose dense” administration of paclitaxel and carboplatin will become the new standard of care. The institution of a new stardard of care may not be officially established until a second clinical trial repeats the results of the JGOG clinical trial. This result is not entirely surprising because “dose dense” administration of chemotherapy is already the standard of care in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer (click here).

2 thoughts on ““Dose Dense” Administration of Paclitaxel and Carboplatin Increases Progression Free and Overall Survival in Ovarian Cancer Patients – Is There a New Standard of Care?

  1. Dear Mary,

    Thank you for the comment. I will try to determine which drug was given first, and more importantly, whether the drug administration order carries significance. I thought that paclitaxel is generally administered first under the general standard of care, but the answer to your question is best directed to Dr. Isonishi. Did you review the full article text? You should be able to obtain a copy of the full text article from an oncologist that you work with or through the medical research staff who work at your facility. If the article does not provide the answer, you could send an email to the study team member listed as the contact person in the full text article. Also, the ASCO website provides a video presentation with respect to Abstract 5506, but it may not provide an answer to your question.

    I trust this information is helpful.

    Best,

    Paul

    Like

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