Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center To Genetically Profile All Patient Tumors

“The Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center has recently opened a new Translational Research Laboratory that will uncover the genetic codes and gene mutations from almost all of its cancer patients. … By embarking on such an ambitious approach, Cancer Center pathologists and oncologists hope to gather specific information about tumor properties that will lead to targeted therapies and better personalized treatments. Mass General will be the first and only cancer center to conduct molecular profiling of positive biopsies and tumors from all patients as part of basic patient care. …”

Genetic profiling

09/Mar/2009

massgenlab

Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center Opens Molecular Pathology Lab to Genetically Profile All Patient Tumors

The Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center has recently opened a new Translational Research Laboratory that will uncover the genetic codes and gene mutations from almost all of its cancer patients. Previously only a sampling of patients had their tumors analyzed in such a comprehensive fashion.

By embarking on such an ambitious approach, Cancer Center pathologists and oncologists hope to gather specific information about tumor properties that will lead to targeted therapies and better personalized treatments. Mass General will be the first and only cancer center to conduct molecular profiling of positive biopsies and tumors from all patients as part of basic patient care.

Scientists and researchers have already identified over 110 genetic mutations responsible for causing tumor growth, many of which are involved in several different types of cancers. Codirectors of the Transplational Research Laboratory, Leif Ellisen, MD, PhD, and A. John Iafrate, MD, PhD, have equipped the lab with state-of-the-art robotic technology, which will make it possible to quickly genotype tumor specimens within a short period of time.

‘This new and improved classification of cancers that we are doing is intended to give our oncologists more information about a individual patient’s cancer, so they can treat it in a very specific way, thereby significantly increasing the odds of success,’ says Iafrate.

Several new cancer drugs that are currently available or in development are able to block some of the mutations and pathways that cause tumor cells to proliferate. By targeting tumor gene mutations with these smart drugs, doctors may be able to eradicate malignant cells without using traditional treatments like chemotherapy and radiation, which have significant side effects.

The lab’s new tumor genotyping initiative should also expedite the time it takes to find the right drug for the right patient. According to Ellisen, ‘If we are able to identify a mutation in, say, a case of lung cancer, and we know that a particular drug has been successful in treating colon cancer patients with the same mutation, then we have good reason to believe that drug will work turning off the cancer-causing mutation in the lung cancer patient as well.’

The lab will start with the genotyping of Mass General’s lung cancer patients and phase in different disease groups over the next few weeks. It is anticipated that the profiling of all possible patient tumors will occur gradually over the coming months.

Learn more about research at the Cancer Center

Cited SourceMassachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center opens molecular pathology lab to genetically profile all patient tumors, News, Massachusetts General Hospital, Mar. 9, 2009.

Update:

  • Making Personalized Cancer Care Routine, In Depth, NCI Cancer Bulletin, Volume 6 / Number 11, National Cancer Institute, June 2, 2009 (noting that Massachusetts General Hospital & Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center are performing genetic profiling of all lung cancer tumors).

14 thoughts on “Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center To Genetically Profile All Patient Tumors

  1. My father has STAGE IV Colon Cancer. He is currently being treated at Sloan-Kettering in NYC by Dr. Lenonard Saltz. He has been on Chemo treatments for the past year now and has really been struggling with it. Any recommendations or thoughts regarding genetic fingerprinting of tumors? Any help would be much appreciated.

    Best Regards,
    Andrew

    Like

    • Andrew,

      I am sorry to hear about your father’s condition. Please let him know that our thoughts and prayers are with him. I have a few thoughts regarding genetic fingerprinting of tumors in the context of colon cancer. Please forgive me if you already know a fair amount of the information below. Based on your comment post, I do not know if your father’s tumor was genetically tested at the time of his initial surgery or biopsy.

      Standard of Care: As you probably know, the standard of care in the first line treatment of colon cancer is surgery followed by FOXFIRI (leucovorin calcium (FOL), 5-fluorouracil (F), and irinotecan (IRI)) or FOLFOX (leucovorin calcium (FOL), 5-fluorouracil (F) and oxaliplatin (OX)). If a clinical trial is selected, the antiangiogenesis drug bevacizumab (Avastin) can be added to both treatment regimes (click here). And, I believe that sorenafib (Nexavar) is also being tested (click here). Also be aware that there are liposomal forms of irinotecan, that in theory, may provide more effect with less toxicity (click here).

      Genetic Testing For KRAS Mutation & Use of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Inhibitors: In early February 2009, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) issued a provisional clinical opinion regarding Testing for KRAS Gene Mutations in Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Carcinoma to Predict Response to Anti–Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Monoclonal Antibody Therapy (full text avail. by clicking on ASCO PDF doc). See also NCI discussion of KRAS genetic testing issue. Based on a systematic review of the relevant literature, all patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma who are candidates for anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody therapy should have their tumor tested for KRAS mutations in a CLIA-accredited laboratory. If KRAS mutation in codon 12 or 13 is detected, then patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma should not receive anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody therapy as part of their treatment. In contrast, if your father’s tumor does not possess a KRAS gene mutation (known as “wildtype” KRAS), EGFR inhibitors may represent a potential line of treatment as a monotherapy or in tandem with chemotherapy. Some of the EGFR inhibitors being used today with respect to colon cancer include cetuximab (Erbitux®) and panitumumab (Vectibix®). I performed a search for open clinical trials that include use of an EGFR inhibitor. To view the results, click here. I am going to assume that your father’s Sloan-Kettering oncologist already tested your father’s tumor for KRAS gene mutation.

      Genetic Testing For B-raf Gene Mutation: The B-raf gene is mutated in 3% to 15% of colon cancers. It is my understanding that a colon cancer tumor that possesses a KRAS gene mutation will not possess a B-raf gene mutation, and one that possesses a B-raf mutation will not possess a KRAS gene mutation. If your father’s tumor possesses a B-raf mutation, the tumor may be sensitive to B-raf inhibitors or MEK inhibitors. For a list of open clinical trials using B-raf inhibitors, click here. For a list of open clinical trials using MEK inhibitors against solid tumors, click here.

      In sum, if your father’s tumor does not possess a KRAS gene mutation or B-raf gene mutation, he may be eligible for treatment with an EGFR inhibitor. If your father’s tumor possesses a B-raf gene mutation, he may be eligible to use a B-raf inhibitor or a MEK inhibitor. Use of an EGFR inhibitor, B-raf inhibitor, or a MEK inhibitor would most likely take place in the context of a clinical trial. If possible, you need to find a center that is willing to test your father’s tumor for gene mutations specific to colon cancer. I think most centers test for KRAS mutation and I know that M.D. Anderson is testing for B-raf mutation. You should also speak with the Fox Chase Cancer Center, Massachusetts General Cancer Center, and Dana-Farber Cancer Center to determine if they are testing colon cancer tumors for select genetic mutations other than the KRAS gene mutation.

      Genetic Predisposition To Colon Cancer: Another idea relates to the fact that your father’s colon cancer could be attributable to hereditary. See Genetics of Colorectal Cancer, NCI PDQ (Dec. 2009). If you could establish that your father’s colon cancer is hereditary, there may be a specific gene mutation(s) associated with a particular form of inherited colon cancer. Once that determination is made, it is possible to identify potential treatment lines aimed at specific genetic defects (PIK3CA inhibitors, mTOR inhibitors, Akt inhibitors inhibitors, etc.). Please note that other than KRAS mutation and B-raf mutation testing, all other attempts to link gene mutations to specific treatments in the context of colon cancer do not represent evidence-based medicine at this point in time. In fact, your dad’s current doctor wrote an article in July 2008 that suggests the future direction of colon cancer treatment (click here).

      Andrew, I hope that you find the information above helpful. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me. Best, Paul

      Like

  2. My husband has pancreatic cancer stage 1V. Has there been any study done genetically on this type of cancer. Please let me know what number I can reach you as well as the doctor’s name specializing in pancreatic cancer.

    The website will give you more info regarding the treatments he already had. To find this, kindly click on the menu button: timeline.

    I am in urgent need.

    Thanks,

    Rose

    Like

    • Dear Rose,

      I am extremely sorry to hear about your husband’s Stage IV metastatic pancreatic cancer. Please know that you, Mike, Gerald and your entire family are in our thoughts and prayers. I visited lopezfight.com and found the website extremely helpful. Mike is very fortunate to have a family of cancer advocates to gather incredibly valuable information. It is easy to see that you have a loving family. It is also good that you live in the Baltimore/Washington D.C. area (where I grew up) because you are in close proximity to several great cancer centers (Johns Hopkins, Sloan-Kettering (NY), Fox-Chase (PA), etc.).

      As you know, Libby’s H*O*P*E*(tm) is dedicated to ovarian cancer, not pancreatic cancer. Undoubtedly, you are also aware it takes a considerable amount of time to gain general knowledge in any area of cancer. That being said, I spent a brief amount of time reviewing pancreatic cancer information and have taken the liberty of providing a few thoughts below.

      My understanding of your husband’s case indicates the following systemic treatments have been tried or are being used. I have not included the surgery or radiotherapy because it is not systemic treatment. Unfortunately, I do not have access to your husband’s pathology report(s), accordingly, I do not know what genetic testing was performed on his tumor. That information would be helpful.

      1st Line: GTX cocktail — Gemzar (gemcitabine), Taxotere (docetaxel) & Xeloda (capecitabine) [Xeloda discontinued but Zometa (zoledronic acid) added].
      2nd Line: Eloxatin (oxaliplatin), Xeloda and Zometa
      3rd Line (starting Nov. 16th): Camptosar (irinotecan hydrochloride)

      Please note that there are forms of “pegylated liposomal irinotecan.” These drugs generally provide more “bang” with fewer side effects. Some of these drugs include: IHL-305, NKTR-102, PEP02, S-CKD602. Be sure to discuss these drugs with the doctor before starting treatment on Nov. 16th.

      To view open clinical trials using IHL-305, CLICK HERE.

      To view open clinical trials using NKTR-102, CLICK HERE.

      To view open clinical trials using PEP02, CLICK HERE. See 2008 ASCO Abstract #2565.

      To view open clinical trials using S CKD 602, CLICK HERE.

      Summary of Clinical Trial Results In Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

      An excellent summary of significant pancreatic clinical trial results is set forth in an editorial that appears in the November 20, 2009 print issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology(JCO). To view the JCO editorial entitled, Changing the Paradigm in Conducting Randomized Clinical Studies in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: An Opportunity for Better Clinical Development, CLICK HERE. The JCO editorial is one of the best advanced pancreatic cancer clinical trial summaries that I have read to date.

      NCI Gastrointestinal Cancer Steering Committee Recommended Molecular Targets

      The National Cancer Institute’s Gastrointestinal Cancer Steering Committee organized a two-day meeting with representatives from the patient advocacy community, pharmaceutical industry and government agencies to discuss the integration of basic and clinical knowledge in the design of clinical trials for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. The group’s major focus was defining the direction for clinical research into the disease for the next three to five years. The committee said research needs to focus on developing new molecular targets for therapy including genetic alterations in pancreatic tumors and epigenetic changes. They listed the KRAS (V-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog) oncogene, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), PI3k (Phosphoinositide 3-kinase), and the hedgehog pathway as some of the more promising pancreatic tumor targets.

      As you know, there are existing drugs being used in clinical trials that target KRAS, EGFR, PI3K (Phosphoinositide 3-kinase), and hedgehog pathways. For example, in the area of colon cancer, KRAS mutation is predictive of response to Vectibix (panitumumab) and Erbitux (cetuximab). Tarceva (erlotinib) is a small molecule EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor. New PI3K targeting drugs, including GDC-0941, NVP-BEZ235, PI-103 SF1126 (a LY294002 prodrug), and AMG 479, have recently been developed and are being evaluated (or will be evaluated) in clinical trials. Hedgehog pathway inhibitor drugs include GDC-0449 and IPI-926. In a recent article appearing in the November 19, 2009 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, researchers suggest that pancreatic cancer is a particularly good candidate for experimental treatment with hedgehog inhibitors. To view an abstract of the NEJM article, click here.

      I have set forth below hyperlinks to open (i.e., recruiting) clinical trials that involve testing of the drugs above against pancreatic cancer & solid tumors. Please be aware that each hyperlink is set up as a search algorithm. If you click on the hyperlink and no trials are found, the trials may closed, suspended, completed or not yet approved. Nevertheless, these algorithm should provide you with a “fresh” (i.e., updated) search each time that you click on the hyperlink. Also note that some of the solid tumor trials found through the search algorithm may not be appropriate for a pancreatic cancer patient.

      Panitumumab (Vectibix)
      pancreatic cancer trials
      solid tumor trials

      Cetuximab (Erbitux)
      pancreatic cancer trials
      solid tumor trials

      Erlotinib (Tarceva)
      pancreatic cancer trials
      solid tumor trials

      GDC-0941
      pancreatic cancer trials
      solid tumor trials

      NVP-BEZ235 (or BEZ235)
      pancreatic cancer trials
      solid tumor trials

      PI-103
      pancreatic cancer trials
      solid tumor trials

      SF1126
      pancreatic cancer trials
      solid tumor trials

      AMG 479
      –open pancreatic cancer clinical trials, click here.
      –open solid tumor clinical trials, click here.

      GDC-0449
      pancreatic cancer trials
      solid tumor trials

      IPI-926
      pancreatic cancer trials
      solid tumor trials

      2009 AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics – Emerging Therapies in Pancreatic Cancer Show Promise

      On November 17, 2009, Craig Thompson, M.D., director of the Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania, moderated a press conference on emerging treatments in pancreatic cancer as part of the the 2009 AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics. The press release issued after the press conference contains several important medical abstracts that address promising pancreatic cancer treatment. To view the press release, click here.

      For your purposes, the most important medical abstract is entitled, Nab-paclitaxel targets tumor stroma and results, combined with gemcitabine, in high efficacy against pancreatic cancer models (Abstract #C246). The relevant portion of the press release provides as follows:

      …”Treatment with nab-paclitaxel appears to weaken the stroma, or protective wall, surrounding a pancreatic tumor and increase the potency of gemcitabine, the most commonly used agent for pancreatic cancer, when the two drugs are used in combination.’What we are seeing here is a real paradigm shift, because it shows that effective treatment does not necessarily require a fancy new molecular therapy but just the smart combination of what is already available,’ said Anirban Maitra, M.D., associate professor of pathology and oncology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

      Both gemcitabine, sold as Gemzar by Eli Lilly and Company, and nab-paclitaxel, sold as Abraxane by Abraxis Bioscience, are clinically available treatments. Researchers at TGen in Arizona and other clinical centers in the United States have already tested the combination in humans and reported preliminary results earlier this year demonstrating a median survival of 10.3 months, as compared to the previously reported 5.7 months survival seen with gemcitabine alone.

      Maitra and colleagues sought to determine the mechanism behind that dramatic finding in 11 freshly generated pancreatic cancer mouse xenografts from Johns Hopkins laboratories.

      Replicating the human trial, the researchers found the response rate of the combination in mice was almost double of what was seen with either agent alone.

      A further evaluation by histology at the cellular level showed that nab-paclitaxel depleted the stroma surrounding pancreatic tumors and thus was able to facilitate delivery of gemcitabine more effectively. Those treated with the combination had a gemcitabine concentration in tumors that was 3.7-fold higher than what was seen with gemcitabine alone.

      ‘What we have done is effectively make gemcitabine-resistant tumors into gemcitabine-sensitive tumors with the added punch of nab-paclitaxel, so we’re getting synergy of the two-drug combination and better delivery of gemcitabine where it needs to be,’ said Maitra … “

      Accordingly, in prior human clinical testing and in the current “mouse model” testing, gemcitabine (Gemzar) in combination with nab-paclitaxel (Abraxane) effectively doubled survival time. More importantly, there are existing pancreatic clinical trials testing gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel which are currently recruiting patients. To view a list of open pancreatic cancer clinical trials testing this drug combination, click here. I thought the first trial listed, which is tesing erlotinib (Tarceva), gemcitabine (Gemzar) & nab-paclitaxel (Abraxane) may be ideal, however, the trial has not begun recruitment as of this writing. Gerald can contact the trial investigator for more information. It is also important to note that the researcher involved in this study is a Johns Hopkins doctor. It is possible that Johns Hopkins may work with you and Gerald to allow Mike to try this drug combination given the fact that Johns Hopkins is familiar with the efficacy of the drug combination and both drugs have already been safely tested on humans.

      I am also providing you with a hyperlink to the Translational Genomic Research Institute (TGen). TGen sponsored the human drug testing described above and is supported in its pancreatic cancer research, in part, by Stand Up To Cancer. (SU2C). On May 27, 2009, TGen announced that it received an $18 million grant from SU2C for pancreatic cancer research. Daniel Von Hoff, M.D., TGen’s Physician-In-Chief, and Craig B. Thompson, M.D., Director of the Abramson Cancer Center at University of Pennsylvania, are co-leaders of SU2C pancreatic cancer “Dream Team,” which will lead a three-year investigation into new approaches to treating pancreatic cancer. To view press release & accompanying YouTube video, click here.

      Although it appears that John Hopkins researchers were in contact with TGen researchers regarding use of the drug combination described above, Gerald may want to contact (or have a Johns Hopkins doctor contact) TGen to gather ideas for the last developments in pancreatic cancer research.

      Clinical Trials Utilizing Gene Expression Analysis

      I also performed a search for clinical trials that reference “pancreatic cancer” and “gene expression analysis.” I did this to identify clinical trials that are using some form of patient genetic testing prior to, during, and/or after treatment. CLICK HERE to view my search results. I believe that clinical trials that utilized gene expression analysis may be run by investigators who are better informed regarding the genetic makeup (including genetic mutation and cellular pathway deregulation) of pancreatic cancer.

      ResearchMatch.org

      ResearchMatch.org is a non-profit service that matches patients with researchers interested in enrolling patients. It is run by a consortium of prestigious educational (some medical) institutions with assistance from NIH. Unlike http://www.clinicaltrials.gov, once you register your husband on this website, the burden is on the researchers to contact you to see if your father is interested in participating. It is a brand new service, so I don’t know how well it works, but it is certainly worth taking the time to register your husband now. There is a possibility that you could be contacted by an interested researcher, so register as soon as possible.

      Access To Investigational Drugs

      Investigational or experimental drugs are new drugs that have not yet been approved by the FDA or approved drugs that have not yet been approved for a new use, and are in the process of being tested for safety and effectiveness. CLICK HERE to learn more.

      Patients may decide to seek access to investigational drugs for different reasons. Some patients with serious or life-threatening illnesses seek treatment with investigational drugs if FDA-approved therapies are not working or if their side effects are too severe. Others may have heard about promising early study results for a specific investigational drug, and they might want to learn more.

      Investigational drugs are available through two pathways designed to protect patients, because an investigational drug may pose unknown risks to patients and we do not know if it is effective. Patients may be eligible to receive an investigational drug as a participant in a clinical trial or as part of an expanded access program (also known as “compassionate use”).

      __________________________

      Rose, I hope this information is helpful. Please have your son Gerald assist you in reviewing the information above. There is a lot of information to review so get some assistance. Gerald seems very knowledgeable about your husband’s case. My quick review of the clinical trials indicates that the clinical trial involving GDC-0449 & erlotinib may be relevant to your husband’s case. Any genetic testing performed by the pathologist on your husband’s tumor may assist you in identifying an appropriate trial. I think you are quickly reaching the point where you may have to try a new drug through clinical trial or FDA-approved (and drug manufacter-approved) “compassionate use.”

      So, if you want to stick with the use of irinotecan beginning on Nov. 16th, please discuss with your doctor the potential of using a liposomal form of that drug. Such drug may allow higher dosing with fewer side effects. I have provided you with two such drugs above and related clinical trials.

      Also, be aware that Gerald will have to review all of the clinical trials with an eye toward whether or not your husband will satisfy the trial entrance criteria. It is important to note that previous treatments received may disqualify your husband for a particular clinical trial. Similarly, entrance into one clinical trial may disqualify your husband from participation in a second trial based upon the second trial’s inclusion and exclusion criteria. It is important to “order” the various lines of treatment so as not to unnecessarily disqualify your husband for a particular or desired treatment down the road.

      I have not had much time to learn about pancreatic cancer but I believe the information will help you. I am going to notify you of this post via email and set forth my contact information within that email.

      God Bless you, Mike, and Gerald. Keep the faith and keep researching.

      Best, Paul

      Like

  3. Dear Dr Paul,

    My name is Yong Yang and work at Cornell University. My sister in law and her brother they are both suffering with IV stage lung cancer in China. One of them is adenocarcinoma and another one is squamous. Both of them were received surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy treatments.

    Recently their cancer were spread to the bone (his) or liver (her). They are searching for targeted therapies and gene therapy. Is there any possibility that they can have a gene profile test for potential targeted therapy or gene therapy?
    Could you please let me know if it is possibl for them.
    Please let me know if you need more patient’s information.

    Yong Yang

    Thanks!
    Yong Yang

    Like

    • Hi Yong,

      Thank you for your comment. First, I must point out that I am not a doctor, nor does Libby’s H*O*P*E*(tm) provide medical advice. Second, I am so sorry to hear about the dire health condition of your sister-in-law and brother. They are in our thoughts and prayers.

      If you click on the title of the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center to Genetically Profile All Patient Tumors weblog posting, you will discover that I answered this same question for Wei Wei. Simply scroll down all comments listed under this posting. Click here and you will be taken to my comment response postings regarding this subject.

      I trust this information is helpful. If you have additional questions, please feel free to contact us again.

      Best,

      Paul

      Like

  4. Dear Dr. Paul,
    I sent the my brother case briefly yesterday, but I have get your reply. I knew your are very busy. Could you please email me or reply this mail to me to see if my brother can get his DNA examined for potential targeted therapy and let me know if you have progressed to this phase of the testing/study. another you mentioned two email address I tried no of them is valid email address. I hope you can help me. Thank you! weiwei

    Like

    • Dear Weiwei,

      You should be aware that I am not a doctor. Also, Libby’s H*O*P*E* is not affiliated with Massachusetts General Hospital. We simply report what we believe is relevant ovarian cancer and cancer-related news.

      The information that we posted in earlier comments is the information that is publicly available. Click here to view the contact information (including direct dial telephone number) for Dr. Leif W. Ellisen M.D., Ph.D. You did not indicate that you attempted to contact the hospital via telephone.

      If you are unable to contact Dr. Ellisen, then contact the Adult Oncology Programs department at the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center. The phone number is 877-789-6100. If that does not work, simply go the Massachusetts General Hospital website and use the contact information posted. Click here to review visitor information. The general Mass. General Hospital phone number is 617-726-2000.

      If you have any further problems, please let us know.

      Best,

      Paul

      Like

    • Hi Weiwei,

      I forgot to provide you with a hyperlink to the June 2, 2009 edition of the National Cancer Institute Cancer Bulletin. That issue of the bulletin contains an article entitled, Making Personalized Cancer Care Routine.

      The article notes that Massachusetts General Hospital & Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) are genetically profiling patient lung cancer tumors. The doctor quoted in the article for MSKCC is Mark G. Kris, M.D., who is the Chief, Thoracic Oncology Service, MSKCC. If you click on Dr. Kris’ hyperlink, you will find his contact information. You may want to contact him as part of your due diligence on behalf of your brother.

      I trust this information is helpful.

      Best Regards,

      Paul

      Like

  5. Dear Dr. Paul,
    My name is weiwei Le and work at Morgan state university. I have a brother who 62 years old and lives in China who suffered lung cancer. He had removed whole left lobe almost 5 years ago on July 2004, the lump was about 3 cm and diagnosis was squamous cell cancer at left lung without any lymphomas transfers. He accepted some chemotherapy after surgery although without any transfers or metastasis at that time, but he didn’t finished the whole chemotherary treatment at first time, because too much side reactions. Unfortunately, the cancer recurred at the second year at his right lung on July 2005 and there was a lump around 2.0 cm. He can’t do further surgery and accepted radiation, Gamma knife treatment plus chemotherapy (Alimta). after that He recurred again and got traditional radiation, chemotherapy again. He is still cough, but not too hard and general condition is fine and still work. He saw new on China TV last week in that you used gene therapy cured female patient who was late stage lung cancer with her pictures. He is very exciting and want to come here to accept your treatment. Could you please let me know if it is possible! Thank you very much! weiwei le

    Like

  6. I have Stage IV Ovarian cancer, and would like to have my DNA examined for potential targeted therapy. Could you please contact me and let me know if you have progressed to this phase of the testing/study. Thank you.

    Sincerely,
    Varinia

    Like

    • Varinia,

      In response to your question, I would contact the Adult Oncology Programs department at the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center. The phone number is 877-789-6100 and the email address is mghcancercenter@partners.org. The Mass. General press release indicates that they will start with lung cancer tumors and proceed to other tumor types over the next several weeks. If the individuals in that department cannot answer your questions, you can contact Leif W. Ellisen, M.D., Ph.D. directly via email. Dr. Ellisen’s email address is ellisen@helix.mgh.harvard.edu. I do not have Dr. Ellisen’s telephone number.

      I hope this information is helpful. If you have any other questions, please feel free to contact me. Our thoughts and prayers are with you.

      Best,

      Paul

      Like

  7. Currently I’m being treated for stage 4 ER breast cancer. Is
    there anyway possible that I might be considered for genetic fingerprinting of tumors..Please notify me at your earliest
    convenience. Thank you.

    Sincerely,
    Geraldine Merrill

    Like

    • Geraldine,

      In response to your question, I would contact the Adult Oncology Programs department at the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center. The phone number is 877-789-6100 and the email address is mghcancercenter@partners.org. The Mass. General press release indicates that they will start with lung cancer tumors and proceed to other tumor types over the next several weeks. If the individuals in that department cannot answer your questions, you can contact Leif W. Ellisen, M.D., Ph.D. directly via email. Dr. Ellisen’s email address is ellisen@helix.mgh.harvard.edu. I do not have Dr. Ellisen’s telephone number.

      I hope this information is helpful. If you have any other questions, please feel free to contact me. My thoughts and prayers are with you as my mother is also a Stage IV breast cancer survivor.

      Best Regards,

      Paul

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s