SU2C Announces the Formation of a New Translational Research Ovarian Cancer “Dream Team”

Ovarian Cancer Community Joins Forces to Fight Deadliest Gynecologic Cancer. The New Stand Up To Cancer Dream Team Will Launch in 2015.

The Ovarian Cancer Research Fund, The Ovarian Cancer National Alliance, and the National Ovarian Cancer Coalition Team Up to Fund New Translational Research Ovarian Cancer “Dream Team.”

 

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A groundbreaking collaboration is underway among three national ovarian cancer organizations: Ovarian Cancer Research Fund (OCRF), Ovarian Cancer National Alliance (OCNA), and National Ovarian Cancer Coalition (NOCC). In partnership with Stand Up To Cancer (SU2C), this group will fund a new Ovarian Cancer Dream Team dedicated to piloting leading-edge, ovarian cancer research that will help patients and save lives.

This partnership was announced tonight by actor Pierce Brosnan on the Stand Up To Cancer’s biennial telecast, and in recognition of National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month. The SU2C-OCRF-OCNA-NOCC Translational Research Dream Team grant will provide funding, over a three-year period, for research associated with this insidious disease.

Ovarian cancer is the deadliest of all the gynecologic cancers. Almost 22,000 American women will be diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 2014, and more than 14,000 women will lose their lives to the disease. By collaborating to fund an Ovarian Cancer Dream Team, OCRF, OCNA and NOCC, with SU2C, will further research in the field that can lead to new treatments and improved patient outcomes.

Later this month, SU2C, through its science partner the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), will issue a “Call for Ideas” from researchers and scientists worldwide. The selected Dream Team will be announced next spring, with research beginning in July 2015.

OCRF“Ovarian Cancer Research Fund has been the leading nonprofit funder of ovarian cancer research for years, and this new collaboration is a wonderful way to mark our 20th anniversary,” said Audra Moran, CEO of Ovarian Cancer Research Fund. “We are excited that the Dream Team grant will continue our long tradition of supporting the most innovative research in the field, while providing scientists with a vital new source of financial support.”

OCNA1Calaneet Balas, CEO of the Ovarian Cancer National Alliance, said: “I am so thrilled that our three organizations are coming together to fight the disease we all care so much about. I believe the Ovarian Cancer Dream Team will be paradigm-shifting for our community, and I cannot wait to see what comes from this new initiative. We’re proud of the work the Alliance has done to secure federal research funding on behalf of all women, but the Dream Team gives us new opportunities for collaboration and innovation.”

NOCC - Logo“We are both proud and excited to join in supporting the Ovarian Cancer Dream Team, the first-ever collaboration of such efforts,” said David Barley, CEO of the National Ovarian Cancer Coalition. “We are looking forward to being instrumental in furthering ovarian cancer research. The impacts on families and communities continue to make ovarian cancer “More Than a Woman’s Disease®.” By working together we hope to make a difference in the lives of everyone we touch.”

About the Ovarian Cancer Research Fund
The Ovarian Cancer Research Fund (OCRF), founded in 1994, is the oldest and largest charity in the United States funding ovarian cancer research, and ranks third in overall ovarian cancer research funding only after the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD). Its mission is to fund scientific research that leads to more effective identification, treatment, and ultimately a cure for ovarian cancer, as well as related educational and support initiatives. OCRF has invested nearly $60 million in ovarian cancer research through 217 grants to scientists at 65 leading medical centers in the United States. OCRF continues to take the lead in funding the best and most promising ovarian cancer research while supporting women and their loved ones affected by this terrible disease in our quest to end it. For more information, please visit www.ocrf.org.

About the Ovarian Cancer National Alliance
The Ovarian Cancer National Alliance is a powerful voice for everyone touched by ovarian cancer. We connect survivors, women at risk, caregivers, and health providers with the information and resources they need. We ensure that ovarian cancer is a priority for lawmakers and agencies in Washington, DC, and throughout the country. We help our community raise their voices on behalf of every life that has been affected by this disease. For more information, please visit: www.ovariancancer.org

About the National Ovarian Cancer Coalition
Since its inception in 1995, the National Ovarian Cancer Coalition (NOCC) has been committed to raising awareness, promoting education, and funding research in support of women, families, and communities touched by ovarian cancer. NOCC is well-established as an important national advocate for patients and families struggling with ovarian cancer. NOCC remains steadfast in its mission to save lives by fighting tirelessly to prevent and cure ovarian cancer, and to improve the quality of life for survivors. For more information, please visit: www.ovarian.org.

About Stand Up To Cancer
Stand Up To Cancer (SU2C) raises funds to accelerate the pace of research to get new therapies to patients quickly and save lives now. SU2C, a program of the Entertainment Industry Foundation (EIF) and a 501(c)(3) charitable organization, was established in 2008 by film and media leaders who utilize the industry’s resources to engage the public in supporting a new, collaborative model of cancer research, and to increase awareness about cancer prevention as well as progress being made in the fight against the disease. For more information, please visit: www.standup2cancer.org

Glutamine Ratio is Key Ovarian Cancer Indicator

Glutamine plays an important role in cellular growth in several cancers. A Rice University-led study shows how ovarian cancer metabolism changes between early and late stages. In this study, a further link between glutamine dependency and tumor invasiveness is established in ovarian cancer.

A Rice University-led analysis of the metabolic profiles of hundreds of ovarian tumors has revealed a new test to determine whether ovarian cancer cells have the potential to metastasize, or spread to other parts of the body. The study also suggests how ovarian cancer treatments can be tailored based on the metabolic profile of a particular tumor.

The research, which appears online this week in Molecular Systems Biology, was conducted at the Texas Medical Center in Houston by researchers from Rice University, the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, and the Baylor College of Medicine.

Deepak Nagrath

Deepak Nagrath, Assistant Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at Rice University

“We found a striking difference between the metabolic profiles of poorly aggressive and highly aggressive ovarian tumor cells, particularly with respect to their production and use of the amino acid glutamine,” said lead researcher Deepak Nagrath Ph.D. of Rice University. “For example, we found that highly aggressive ovarian cancer cells are glutamine-dependent, and in our laboratory studies, we showed that depriving such cells of external sources of glutamine — as some experimental drugs do — was an effective way to kill late-stage cells.

“The story for poorly aggressive cells was quite different,” said Nagrath, Assistant Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at Rice. “These cells use an internal metabolic pathway to produce a significant portion of the glutamine that they consume, so a different type of treatment — one aimed toward internal glutamine sources — will be needed to target cells of this type.”

The research is part of a growing effort among cancer researchers worldwide to create treatments that target the altered metabolism of cancer cells. It has long been known that cancer cells adjust their metabolism in subtle ways that allow them to proliferate faster and survive better. In 1924, Otto Warburg showed that cancer cells produced far more energy from glycolysis than did normal cells. The Nobel Prize-winning discovery became known as the “Warburg effect,” and researchers long believed that all cancers behaved in this way. Intense research in recent decades has revealed a more nuanced picture.

“Each type of cancer appears to have its own metabolic signature,” Nagrath said. “For instance, kidney cancer does not rely on glutamine, and though breast cancer gets some of its energy from glutamine, it gets even more from glycolysis. For other cancers, including glioblastoma and pancreatic cancer, glutamine appears to be the primary energy source.”

Rice University Researchers

Researchers at Rice University’s Laboratory for Systems Biology of Human Diseases analyzed the metabolic profiles of hundreds of ovarian tumors and discovered a new test to determine whether ovarian cancer cells have the potential to metastasize. Study co-authors include, from left, Julia Win, Stephen Wahlig, Deepak Nagrath, Hongyun Zhao, Lifeng Yang and Abhinav Achreja.

Nagrath, director of Rice University’s Laboratory for Systems Biology of Human Diseases, said the new metabolic analysis indicates that ovarian cancer may be susceptible to multidrug cocktails, particularly if the amounts of the drugs can be tailored to match the metabolic profile of a patient’s tumor.

The research also revealed a specific biochemical test that pathologists could use to guide such treatments. The test involves measuring the ratio between the amount of glutamine that a cell takes up from outside and the amount of glutamine it makes internally.

“This ratio proved to be a robust marker for prognosis,” said University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center co-author Anil Sood, M.D., Professor of Gynecologic Oncology and Reproductive Medicine and co-director of the Center for RNA Interference and Non-Coding RNA. “A high ratio was directly correlated to tumor aggression and metastatic capability. Patients with this profile had the worst prognosis for survival.”

The three-year study included cell culture studies at Rice as well as a detailed analysis of gene-expression profiles of more than 500 patients from the Cancer Genome Atlas and protein-expression profiles from about 200 M.D. Anderson patients.

“The enzyme glutaminase is key to glutamine uptake from outside the cell, and glutaminase is the primary target that everybody is thinking about right now in developing drugs,” Nagrath said. “We found that targeting only glutaminase will miss the less aggressive ovarian cancer cells because they are at a metabolic stage where they are not yet glutamine-dependent.”

Lifeng

Lifeng Yang, Study Lead Author & Graduate Student, Systems Biology of Human Diseases, Rice University

Rice University graduate student Lifeng Yang, lead author of the study, designed a preclinical experiment to test the feasibility of a multidrug approach, involving the use of a JAK inhibitor and a glutaminase inhibitor. This “drug cocktail” approach inhibited the early stage production of internal glutamine, while also limiting the uptake of external glutamine.

“That depleted all sources of glutamine for the cells, and we found that cell proliferation decreased significantly,” Yang said.

Nagrath said the study also revealed another key finding — a direct relationship between glutamine and an ovarian cancer biomarker called “STAT3” (Signal Transducer And Activator Of Transcription 3).

“A systems-level understanding of the interactions between metabolism and signaling is vital to developing novel strategies to tackle cancer,” said M.D. Anderson co-author Prahlad Ram Ph.D., Associate Professor of Systems Biology and co-director of the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center’s Systems Biology Program. “STAT3 is the primary marker that is used today to ascertain malignancy, tumor aggression and metastasis in ovarian cancer.”

Nagrath said, “The higher STAT3 is, the more aggressive the cancer. For the first time, we were able to show how glutamine regulates STAT3 expression through a well-known metabolic pathway called the TCA cycle, which is also known as the ‘Krebs cycle.’”

Nagrath said the research is ongoing. Ultimately, Dr. Nagrath hopes the investigations will lead to new treatment regimens for cancer as well as a better understanding of the role of cancer-cell metabolism in metastasis and drug resistance.

Co-authors include Hongyun Zhao, Stephen Wahlig, Abhinav Achreja and Julia Win (all affiliated with Rice University); Tyler Moss, Lingegowda Mangala, Guillermo Armaiz-Pena, Dahai Jiang, Rajesha Roopaimoole, Cristian Rodriguez-Aguayo, Imelda Mercado-Uribe, Gabriel Lopez-Berestein and Jinsong Liu (all affiliated with M.D. Anderson Cancer Center); Juan Marini of Baylor College of Medicine; and Takashi Tsukamoto of Johns Hopkins University.

The research was supported by seed funding from (i) the Collaborative Advances in Biomedical Computing Program at Rice Univesity’s Ken Kennedy Institute for Information Technology, (ii) Rice University’s John and Ann Doerr Fund for Computational Biomedicine, (iii) the Odyssey Fellowship Program at the MD Anderson Cancer Center, (iv) the estate of C.G. Johnson Jr., (v) the National Institutes of Health, (vi) the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas, (v) the Ovarian Cancer Research Fund, (vi) the Blanton-Davis Ovarian Cancer Research Program, (vii) the Gilder Foundation, and (viii) the MD Anderson Cancer Center.

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Ovarian Cancer Cells Are More Aggressive On Soft Tissues

When ovarian cancer spreads from the ovaries it almost always does so to a layer of fatty tissue that lines the gut. A new study has found that ovarian cancer cells are more aggressive on these soft tissues due to the mechanical properties of this environment. The finding is contrary to what is seen with other malignant cancer cells that seem to prefer stiffer tissues.

Model Release-YES

Professor Michelle Dawson and graduate student Daniel McGrail used traction force microscopy to measure the forces exerted by cancer cells on soft and stiff surfaces. (Photo Credit: Rob Felt, Georgia Institute of Technology)

“What we found is that there are some cancer cells that respond to softness as opposed to stiffness,” said Michelle Dawson, an assistant professor in the School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. “Ovarian cancer cells that are highly metastatic respond to soft environments by becoming more aggressive.”

Ovarian cancer cells spread, or metastasize, by a different method than other cancer cells. Breast cancer cells, for example, break off from a solid tumor and flow through the blood until they arrest in small blood vessels. The cancer cells then penetrate the vessel surface to form a tumor. Because ovarian tumors are in the abdomen, these cancer cells are shed into the surrounding fluid and not distributed through the blood. They must be able to adhere directly to the fatty tissue that lines the gut, called the omentum, to begin forming a tumor. The new study discovered details about how ovarian cancer cells seem to prefer the mechanical properties of this soft tissue.

The study was published in a recent advance online edition of the Journal of Cell Science and was sponsored by the National Science Foundation and the Georgia Tech and Emory Center for Regenerative Medicine.

The research team, led by Daniel McGrail, a graduate student in the Dawson lab, found that ovarian cancer cells in vitro were more adherent to a layer of soft fat cells than a layer of stiffer bone cells, and that this behavior was also repeated using gels of similar rigidities.

“All the behaviors that we associate with breast cancer cells on these more rigid environments are flipped for ovarian cancer cells,” Dawson said.

After adhering to these soft surfaces, metastatic ovarian cancer cells became more aggressive. Their proliferation increased and they were less responsive to chemotherapeutics. The ovarian cancer cells were also more motile on soft surfaces, moving nearly twice as fast as on rigid surfaces.

The team also found that less aggressive cells that do not metastasize do not exhibit any of these changes.

The researchers used techniques that haven’t been traditionally used in the study of ovarian cancer. They measured the force exerted by the cells by tracking the displacement of beads in the environment around the cells. The researchers found that the metastatic cells increased their traction forces – used to generate motion – by three-fold on soft surfaces, but no such change was present in the less aggressive cells.

“We think the behavior that metastatic ovarian cancer cells exert on these soft surfaces is representative of the mechanical tropism that they have for these softer tissues in the gut,” Dawson said.

In future work, the researchers will investigate whether ovarian cancer cells have some natural inclination towards this uniquely more aggressive behavior in softer environments.

“We’re trying to find out whether there is some internal programming that leads to this aggressive behavior,” Dawson said.

This research is supported by the National Science Foundation under award number 1032527, and the Georgia Tech and Emory Center for Regenerative Medicine under award number 1411304. Any conclusions or opinions are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the sponsoring agencies.

Source:  McGrail DJ, et al., The malignancy of metastatic ovarian cancer cells is increased on soft matrices through a mechanosensitive Rho-ROCK pathway. (Journal of Cell Science, 2014). http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/?jcs.144378.

TGen-led Study Discovers Genetic Cause of a Rare Type of Ovarian Cancer

TGen-led study discovers genetic cause of a rare type of ovarian cancer. Scientific breakthrough could lead to new cancer treatments; study inspired by the memory of Taryn Ritchey, a 22-year-old patient who lost her battle to the disease.

The cause of a rare type of ovarian cancer that most often strikes girls and young women has been uncovered by an international research team led by the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), according to a study published online recently by the renowned scientific journal, Nature Genetics. [1] In a scientific rarity, two additional studies with similar results were also published online on the same day in Nature Genetics, producing immediate validation and reflecting a scientific consensus that usually takes months or even years to accomplish. [2-3]

By applying its groundbreaking work in genomics, TGen led a study that included: Scottsdale Healthcare, Mayo Clinic, Johns Hopkins University, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center; Evergreen Hematology and Oncology, Children’s Hospital of Alabama, the Autonomous University of Barcelona, British Columbia Cancer Agency, University of British Columbia, and the University Health Network-Toronto.

The findings revealed a “genetic superhighway” mutation in a gene found in the overwhelming majority of patients with small cell carcinoma of the ovary, hypercalcemic type, also known as “SCCOHT.” This rare type of ovarian cancer is usually not diagnosed until it is in its advanced stages. It does not respond to standard chemotherapy, and 65 percent of patients with the disease die within 2 years. SCCOHT can affect girls as young as 14 months, and women as old as 58 years – with a mean age of only 24 years old. In this study, the youngest patient was 9 years old.

The three separate groups of international researchers reported strikingly similar scientific findings related to SCCOHT, as provided below.

  • Identification of germline (i.e., inherited) and somatic (lifetime acquired) inactivating mutations in the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling gene SMARCA4 in 75% (9/12) of SCCOHT cases, in addition to SMARCA4 protein loss in 82% (14/17) of the SCCOHT tumors. Notably, only 0.4% (2/485) of the other primary ovarian tumors tested possessed similar genomic characteristics. [Ref. 1]
  • Identification of recurrent inactivating mutations in the SMARCA4 gene in 12 of 12 SCCOHT tumor samples. [Ref. 2]
  • Indentification of germline inactivating mutations in familial cases of SCCOHT. Through additional analysis of non-familial tumors, the researchers determined that nearly 100% of tumors carry SMARCA4 mutations, and 38 of 40 lack protein expression.[Ref. 3]

Collectively, these findings implicate inactivating mutations in the SMARCA4 gene as a major cause of SCCOHT, and may lead researchers to improvements in genetic counseling, as well as the development of new targeted therapy treatment approaches.

Dr. Jeffrey Trent, President and Research Director of TGen, is the study's senior author.

Dr. Jeffrey Trent, President and Research Director of TGen, is the study’s senior author.

“This is a thoroughly remarkable study. Many genetic anomalies can be like a one-lane road to cancer; difficult to negotiate. But these findings indicate a genetic superhighway that leads right to this highly aggressive disease,” said Dr. Jeffrey Trent, President and Research Director of TGen, and the study’s senior author. “The correlation between mutations in SMARCA4 and the development of SCCOHT is simply unmistakable.”

Dr. Trent added that while the breakthrough is for a relatively rare cancer, discovering the origins of this type of ovarian cancer could have implications for more common diseases.

Much of the work in this study was inspired by the memory of Taryn Ritchey, a 22-year-old TGen patient who in 2007 lost her battle with ovarian cancer, the 5th leading cause of cancer death among American women.

“Taryn would be incredibly excited about this amazing new study, and she would be glad and thankful that other young women like her might now be helped because of TGen’s ongoing research,” said Taryn’s mother Judy Jost of Cave Creek, Arizona. “My daughter never gave up, and neither has TGen.”

The SMARCA4 gene – previously associated with lung, brain and pancreatic cancer – was the only recurrently mutated gene in the study’s samples. The implications of this discovery, therefore, may be widespread.

“The findings in this study represent a landmark in the field. The work identifies SMARCA4 mutations as the culprit, and most future research on this disease will be based on this remarkable discovery,” said Dr. Bert Vogelstein, Director of the Ludwig Center at Johns Hopkins University, Investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, and pioneer in the field of cancer genomics. He did not participate in the study but is familiar with its findings.

“The past decade of research has taught us that cancer is a vastly complex disease. Profound patient-to-patient variability has made treatment and diagnosis for many tumor types at times very difficult. In this case, however, we have found a single genetic event driving SCCOHT in nearly every patient,” said Dr. William Hendricks, a TGen Staff Scientist and another author of the study.

“We have shown that loss of SMARCA4 protein expression is extremely specific to SCCOHT and can facilitate the diagnosis of SCCOHT,” said Dr. Anthony N. Karnezis, a fellow at the British Columbia Cancer Agency located in Vancouver, Canada, and one of the study’s authors.

Pilar Ramos, a TGen Research Associate, is the study's lead author.

Pilar Ramos, a TGen Research Associate, is the study’s lead author. “By definitively identifying the relationship between SMARCA4 and SCCOHT, we have high confidence that we have set the stage for clinical trials that could provide patients with immediate benefit.”

“By definitively identifying the relationship between SMARCA4 and SCCOHT, we have high confidence that we have set the stage for clinical trials that could provide patients with immediate benefit.”

“We set out to uncover any small sliver of hope for women afflicted with this rare cancer. What we found instead are the nearly universal underpinnings of SCCOHT,” said Pilar Ramos, a TGen Research Associate, and the study’s lead author. “By definitively identifying the relationship between SMARCA4 and SCCOHT, we have high confidence that we have set the stage for clinical trials that could provide patients with immediate benefit.”

The TGen-led study was supported by grants from: the Marsha Rivkin Center for Ovarian Cancer Research, the Anne Rita Monahan Foundation, the Ovarian Cancer Alliance of Arizona, the Small Cell Ovarian Cancer Foundation, and philanthropic support to the TGen Foundation. Further support was provided by the Terry Fox Research Initiative’s New Frontiers Program in Cancer, and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

For more information about TGen’s research into small cell carcinoma of the ovary (SCCO), or to participate in a future study, visit: www.tgen.org/scco.

About TGen

Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix, Arizona-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting cutting-edge genomic research to accelerate breakthroughs in healthcare. TGen is focused on helping patients with cancer, neurological disorders and diabetes, through cutting edge translational research (the process of rapidly moving research towards patient benefit). TGen physicians and scientists work to unravel the genetic components of both common and rare complex diseases in adults and children. Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities literally worldwide, TGen makes a substantial contribution to help our patients through efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. For more information, visit: www.tgen.org.

References:

1./ Ramos P, et al.  Small cell carcinoma of the ovary, hypercalcemic type, displays frequent inactivating germline and somatic mutations in SMARCA4. Nature Genetics (published online 23 March 2014) doi:10.1038/ng.2928.

2./ Jelinic P, et al. Recurrent SMARCA4 mutations in small cell carcinoma of the ovaryNature Genetics (published online 23 March 2014) doi:10.1038/ng.2922.

3./ Witkowski L, et al.  Germline and somatic SMARCA4 mutations characterize small cell carcinoma of the ovary, hypercalcemic type.  Nature Genetics (published online 23 March 2014) doi:10.1038/ng.2931

Additional Information:

 

Libby’s H*O*P*E* & Women’s Oncology Research & Dialogue Launch New “WORD of HOPE™” Ovarian Cancer Educational Podcast Series

WORD OF HOPE™ Ovarian Cancer Podcast Now Available Through New Website, iTunes, YouTube, and Other Online Sources.

A new ovarian cancer educational podcast series, entitled “WORD of HOPE™,” was launched during Women’s Health Awareness Week through a collaborative initiative of Libby’s H*O*P*E*™ (LH) and Women’s Oncology Research & Dialogue (WORD).

The WORD of HOPE™ Ovarian Cancer podcast series will address important topics related to ovarian cancer, including prevention, early detection, diagnosis, groundbreaking treatments, scientific and clinical research information, and related women’s health information for ovarian cancer patients, caregivers and advocates. The WORD of HOPE™ podcast series can be found online at http://www.wordofhopepodcast.com, and is available to viewers and listeners for subscription at the WORD Of HOPE™ podcast website, iTunes, and YouTube.

“From the beginning, WORD has been committed to taking the most important scientific information and providing patients, caregivers and advocates the easily accessible resources to educate and inspire during their journey of care. As a physician, nearly every day we are looking for resources to give newly diagnosed patients and their supporters to help them better understand their diagnosis and treatment options. We are proud to partner with Libby’s H*O*P*E*™ and its founder Paul Cacciatore in the production of these new podcasts,” said Dr. John Geisler, WORD co-founder and Director of Gynecologic Oncology at University of Toledo.

Paul Cacciatore, Libby’s H*O*P*E* founder and podcast co-host said: “The WORD of HOPE™ ovarian cancer podcast series embodies the age old adage that ‘information is power’ — a potentially life-saving concept in the fight against the most lethal gynecologic cancer.” Mr. Cacciatore emphasized that the information featured in the podcast series is easy to understand and accessible from anywhere, including at home, on the job, or on the go through a smartphone or iPad. “WORD of HOPE™ not only raises much-needed ovarian cancer awareness in the minds of the general public, it educates survivors to proactively participate in their treatment through more meaningful dialogue with their doctors. Libby’s H*O*P*E* is proud to partner with WORD through this global form of social media.”

The first podcast installment will feature the following seven episodes (three already posted; four pending) which address ten significant 2010 scientific research and clinical treatment topics within the field of ovarian cancer:

Viewers or listeners of WORD of HOPE™ Ovarian Cancer Podcast can contact Nathan Manahan, WORD Executive Director, via email to provide feedback and ideas for the podcast. To listen, watch or subscribe to the podcast series, visit http://www.wordofhopepodcast.com.

About the WORD of HOPE™ Podcast

Based in Indianapolis, Indiana (WORD) and Los Angeles, California (LH), WORD of HOPE™ serves viewers and listeners interested in up-to-date ovarian cancer information. Hosted by Nathan Manahan and Paul Cacciatore, WORD of HOPE™ ovarian cancer podcasts will be released several times a month and available for subscription through iTunes, RSS and YouTube.

About Women’s Oncology Research & Dialogue

Co-founded by gynecologic oncologists Drs. Kelly Manahan and John Geisler, WORD is an Indianapolis-based nonprofit organization dedicated to helping women conquer gynecologic cancers through catalyzing innovative scientific and clinical research, which results in empowering educational resources for women’s organizations and medical personnel regarding proper prevention, diagnosis and treatment.

About Libby’s H*O*P*E*™

Paul Cacciatore established Libby’s H*O*P*E*(*Helping *Ovarian Cancer Survivors *Persevere Through *Education)™ in March 2008 as an online resource to assist his 26-year-old cousin, Elizabeth “Libby” Remick, who was battling advanced-stage ovarian cancer. Although Libby ultimately lost her battle to the disease, Paul continues to assist ovarian cancer survivors worldwide, and their families and friends, through the website under the principle that “information is power” in the fight against ovarian cancer. Through Libby’s H*O*P*E*™, Paul has published approximately 250 weblog articles relating to ovarian cancer and cancer-related topics. Libby’s H*O*P*E*™ utilizes a variety of online media resources and social networks to disseminate critical information relating to ovarian cancer awareness, including the early warning signs and symptoms of the disease, important medical discoveries, relevant current clinical trials, and most importantly, stories of hope involving ovarian cancer survivors and their families. To learn more, visit https://healthinfoispower.wordpress.com

For more information, contact Executive Producer, Chad Braham at 317-855-8144 or visit the official website: http://www.wordofhopepodcast.com.

2011 SGO Annual Meeting: Ovarian Cancer Abstracts Selected For Presentation

The March 2011 supplemental issue of Gynecologic Oncology sets forth the ovarian cancer and ovarian cancer-related medical abstracts selected by the Society of Gynecologic Oncologists for presentation at its 42nd Annual Meeting on Women’s Cancer™, which is being held in Orlando, Florida from March 6-9, 2011.

The Society of Gynecologic Oncologists (SGO) is hosting its 42nd Annual Meeting on Women’s Cancer™ (March 6–9, 2011) in Orlando, Florida. The SGO Annual Meeting attracts more than 1,700 gynecologic oncologists and other health professional from around the world.

In connection with this premier gynecologic cancer event, 651 abstracts, and 27 surgical films were submitted for consideration. After careful discussion and deliberation, the SGO selected 51 abstracts for oral presentation (27 Plenary session papers, 24 Focused Plenary papers, and 42 Featured Posters, presented in a new, electronic format), along with 227 for poster presentation. Of the 27 surgical films originally submitted, five films were selected for presentation during a featured Focused Plenary session.

The ovarian cancer abstracts listed below were obtained from the March 2011 supplemental issue of Gynecologic Oncology. Each abstract bears the number that it was assigned in the Gynecologic Oncology journal table of contents.

Please note that we provide below (under the heading “Additional Information”) Adobe Reader PDF copies of the 2011 SGO Annual Meeting program summary and the medical abstract booklet (includes all gynecologic cancer topics). If you require a free copy of the Adobe Reader software, please visit http://get.adobe.com/reader/otherversions/.

For your convenience, we listed the 2011 SGO Annual Meeting ovarian cancer abstracts under the following subject matter headings:  (1) ovarian cancer symptoms, (2) ovarian cancer screening, (3) pathology, (4) ovarian cancer staging, (5) chemotherapy, (6) diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers, (7) clinical trial drugs and results, (8) hereditary breast & ovarian cancer syndrome (BRCA gene deficiencies & Lynch Syndrome), (9) gynecologic practice, (10) gynecologic surgery, (11) genetic/molecular profiling, (12) immunotherapy, (13) medical imaging, (14) preclinical studies – general, (15) preclinical studies – potential therapeutic targets, (16) palliative and supportive care, (17) rare ovarian cancers, (18) survival data, (19) survivorship, (20) other, (21) late breaking abstracts.

Ovarian Cancer Symptoms

142. Utility of symptom index in women at increased risk for ovarian cancer. (SGO Abstract #140)

184. Symptom-triggered screening for ovarian cancer: A pilot study of feasibility and acceptability. (SGO Abstract #182)

187. Women without ovarian cancer reporting disease-specific symptoms. (SGO Abstract #185)

Ovarian Cancer Screening

12. Ovarian cancer: Predictors of primary care physicians’ referral to gynecologic oncologists. (SGO Abstract #10)

84. Long-term survival of patients with epithelial ovarian cancer detected by sonographic screening. (SGO Abstract #82)

90. Significant endometrial pathology detected during a transvaginal ultrasound screening trial for ovarian cancer. (SGO Abstract #88)

109. Detection of the tissue-derived biomarker peroxiredoxin 1 in serum of patients with ovarian cancer: A biomarker feasibility study. (SGO Abstract #107)

113. Epithelial ovarian cancer tumor microenvironment is a favorable biomarker resource. (SGO Abstract #111)

127. Stop and smell the volatile organic compounds: A novel breath-based bioassay for detection of ovarian cancer. (SGO Abstract #125)

144. Incidental gynecologic FDG-PET/CT findings in women with a history of breast cancer. (SGO Abstract #142)

156. Discovery of novel monoclonal antibodies (MC1–MC6) to detect ovarian cancer in serum and differentiate it from benign tumors. (SGO Abstract #154)

158. Evaluation of the risk of ovarian malignancy algorithm (ROMA) in women with a pelvic mass presenting to general gynecologists. (SGO Abstract #156)

162. Human epididymis protein 4 increases specificity for the detection of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer in premenopausal women presenting with an adnexal mass. (SGO Abstract #160)

163. Identification of biomarkers to improve specificity in preoperative assessment of ovarian tumor for risk of cancer. (SGO Abstract #161)

171. OVA1 has high sensitivity in identifying ovarian malignancy compared with preoperative assessment and CA-125. (SGO Abstract #169)

172. OVA1 improves the sensitivity of the ACOG referral guidelines for an ovarian mass. (SGO Abstract #170)

182. Sonographic predictors of ovarian malignancy. (SGO Abstract #180)

237. Management of complex pelvic masses using the OVA1 test: A decision analysis. (SGO Abstract #235)

241. Three-dimensional power doppler angiography as a three-step technique for differential diagnosis of adnexal masses: A prospective study. (SGO Abstract #239)

Pathology

145. Accuracy of frozen-section diagnosis of ovarian borderline tumor. (SGO Abstract #143)

Ovarian Cancer Staging

31. Should stage IIIC ovarian cancer be further stratified by intraperitoneal versus retroperitoneal-only disease? A Gynecologic Oncology Group study. (SGO Abstract #29)

173. Peritoneal staging biopsies in early-stage ovarian cancer: Are they necessary? (SGO Abstract #171)

Chemotherapy

29. Treatment of chemotherapy-induced anemia in patients with ovarian cancer: Does the use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents worsen survival? (SGO Abstract #27)

69. Intraperitoneal chemotherapy for recurrent ovarian cancer appears efficacious with high completion rates and low complications. (SGO Abstract #67)

174. Predictors of severe and febrile neutropenia during primary chemotherapy for ovarian cancer. (SGO Abstract #172)

177. Sequencing of therapy and outcomes associated with use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in advanced epithelial ovarian cancer in the Medicare population. (SGO Abstract #175)

179. Should we treat patients with ovarian cancer with positive retroperitoneal lymph nodes with intraperitoneal chemotherapy? Impact of lymph node status in women undergoing intraperitoneal chemotherapy. (SGO Abstract #177)

229. Predictors and effects of reduced relative dose intensity in women receiving their primary course of chemotherapy for ovarian cancer. (SGO Abstract #227)

Diagnostic & Prognostic Biomarkers

128. Stress and the metastatic switch in epithelial ovarian carcinoma. (SGO Abstract #126)

130. The cytoskeletal gateway for tumor aggressiveness in ovarian cancer is driven by class III β-tubulin. (SGO Abstract #128)

134. True blood: Platelets as a biomarker of ovarian cancer recurrence. (SGO Abstract #132)

148. CA-125 changes can predict optimal interval cytoreduction in patients with advanced-stage epithelial ovarian cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. (SGO Abstract #146)

149. CA-125 surveillance for women with ovarian, fallopian tube or primary peritoneal cancers: What do survivors think? (SGO Abstract #147)

150. Calretinin as a prognostic indicator in granulosa cell tumor. (SGO Abstract #148)

135. Tumor expression of the type I insulin-like growth factor receptor is an independent prognostic factor in epithelial ovarian cancer. (SGO Abstract #133)

147. C-terminal binding protein 2: A potential marker for response to histone deacetylase inhibitors in epithelial ovarian cancer. (SGO Abstract #145)

157. Elevated serum adiponectin levels correlate with survival in epithelial ovarian cancers. (SGO Abstract #155)

175. Prognostic impact of prechemotherapy HE4 and CA-125 levels in patients with ovarian cancer. (SGO Abstract #175)

178. Serum HE4 level is an independent risk factor of surgical outcome and prognosis of epithelial ovarian cancer. (SGO Abstract #176)

Clinical Trial Drugs & Results

8. MicroRNA as a novel predictor of response to bevacizumab in recurrent serous ovarian cancer: An analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas. (SGO Abstract #6)

9. Prospective investigation of risk factors for gastrointestinal adverse events in a phase III randomized trial of bevacizumab in first-line therapy of advanced epithelial ovarian cancer, primary peritoneal cancer or fallopian tube cancer: A Gynecologic Oncology Group study. (SGO Abstract #7)

10. First in human trial of the poly(ADP)-ribose polymerase inhibitor MK-4827 in patients with advanced cancer with antitumor activity in BRCA-deficient and sporadic ovarian cancers.  (SGO Abstract #8)

30. An economic analysis of intravenous carboplatin plus dose-dense weekly paclitaxel versus intravenous carboplatin plus every three-weeks paclitaxel in the upfront treatment of ovarian cancer. (SGO Abstract #28)

51. BRCA1-deficient tumors demonstrate enhanced cytotoxicity and T-cell recruitment following doxil treatment. (SGO Abstract #49)

54. A novel combination of a MEK inhibitor and fulvestrant shows synergistic antitumor activity in estrogen receptor-positive ovarian carcinoma. (SGO Abstract #52)

68. An economic analysis of bevacizumab in recurrent treatment of ovarian cancer. (SGO Abstract #66)

71. A phase II study of gemcitabine, carboplatin and bevacizumab for the treatment of platinum-sensitive recurrent ovarian cancer. (SGO Abstract #69)

72. A phase I clinical trial of a novel infectivity-enhanced suicide gene adenovirus with gene transfer imaging capacity in patients with recurrent gynecologic cancer. (SGO Abstract #70)

73. A phase I study of a novel lipopolymer-based interleukin-12 gene therapeutic in combination with chemotherapy for the treatment of platinum-sensitive recurrent ovarian cancer. (SGO Abstract #71)

74. AMG 386 combined with either pegylated liposomal doxorubicin or topotecan in patients with advanced ovarian cancer: Results from a phase Ib study. (SGO Abstract #72)

86. Pressure to respond: Hypertension predicts clinical benefit from bevacizumab in recurrent ovarian cancer. (SGO Abstract #84)

152. Changes in tumor blood flow as estimated by dynamic-contrast MRI may predict activity of single-agent bevacizumab in recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer and primary peritoneal cancer: An exploratory analysis of a Gynecologic Oncology Group phase II trial. (SGO Abstract #150)

153. Comparing overall survival in patients with epithelial ovarian, primary peritoneal or fallopian tube cancer who received chemotherapy alone versus neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by delayed primary debulking. (SGO Abstract #151)

154. Consolidation paclitaxel is more cost-effective than bevacizumab following upfront treatment of advanced ovarian cancer. (SGO Abstract #152)

193. Pegylated liposomal doxorubicin with bevacizumab in the treatment of platinum-resistant ovarian cancer: Toxicity profile results. (SGO Abstract #191)

194. Phase II Trial of docetaxel and bevacizumab in recurrent ovarian cancer within 12 months of prior platinum-based chemotherapy. (SGO Abstract #192)

195. A phase I/II trial of IDD-6, an autologous dendritic cell vaccine for women with advanced ovarian cancer in remission. (SGO Abstract #193)

183. STAC: A phase II study of carboplatin/paclitaxel/bevacizumab followed by randomization to either bevacizumab alone or erlotinib and bevacizumab in the upfront management of patients with ovarian, fallopian tube or peritoneal cancer. (SGO Abstract #181)

228. Is it more cost-effective to use bevacizumab in the primary treatment setting or at recurrence? An economic analysis. (SGO Abstract #226)

240. The use of bevacizumab and cytotoxic and consolidation chemotherapy for the upfront treatment of advanced ovarian cancer: Practice patterns among medical and gynecologic oncology SGO members. (SGO Abstract #238)

Hereditary Breast & Ovarian Cancer Syndrome (BRCA gene deficiencies & Lynch Syndrome)

39. BRCAness profile of ovarian cancer predicts disease recurrence. (SGO Abstract #37)

52. A history of breast carcinoma predicts worse survival in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers with ovarian carcinoma. (SGO Abstract #52)

137. Does genetic counseling for women at high risk of harboring a deleterious BRCA mutation alter risk-reduction strategies and cancer surveillance behaviors? (SGO Abstract #135)

138. Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome based on family history alone and implications for patients with serous carcinoma. (SGO Abstract #138)

139. Management and clinical outcomes of women with BRCA1/2 mutations found to have occult cancers at the time of risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy. (SGO Abstract #137)

141. The impact of BRCA testing on surgical treatment decisions for patients with breast cancer. (SGO Abstract #139)

136. Compliance with recommended genetic counseling for Lynch syndrome: Room for improvement. (SGO Abstract #134)

Gynecologic Practice

81. Availability of gynecologic oncologists for ovarian cancer care. (SGO Abstract #79)

Gynecologic Surgery

19. Single-port paraaortic lymph node dissection. (SGO Abstract #17)

20. Robotic nerve-sparing radical hysterectomy type C1. (SGO Abstract #18)

21. Urinary reconstruction after pelvic exenteration: Modified Indiana pouch. (SGO Abstract #19)

22. Intrathoracic cytoreductive surgery by video-assisted thoracic surgery in advanced ovarian carcinoma. (SGO Abstract #20)

26. Cost comparison of strategies for the management of venous thromboembolic event risk following laparotomy for ovarian cancer. (SGO Abstract #24)

28. Primary debulking surgery versus neoadjuvant chemotherapy in stage IV ovarian cancer. (SGO Abstract #26)

33. Does the bedside assistant matter in robotic surgery: An analysis of patient outcomes in gynecologic oncology. (SGO Abstract #31)

48. Defining the limits of radical cytoreductive surgery for ovarian cancer. (SGO Abstract #46)

87. Prognostic impact of lymphadenectomy in clinically early-stage ovarian malignant germ cell tumor. (SGO Abstract #85)

93. Secondary cytoreductive surgery: A key tool in the management of recurrent ovarian sex cord–stromal tumors. (SGO Abstract #91)

146. Advanced-stage ovarian cancer metastases to sigmoid colon mesenteric lymph nodes: Clinical consideration of tumor spread and biologic behavior. (SGO Abstract #144)

155. Cytoreductive surgery for serous ovarian cancer in patients 75 years and older. (SGO Abstract #153)

168. Intraperitoneal catheters placed at the time of bowel surgery: A review of complications. (SGO Abstract #166)

169. Laparoscopic versus laparotomic surgical staging for early-stage epithelial ovarian cancer. (SGO Abstract #167)

170. Oncologic and reproductive outcomes of cystectomy compared with oophorectomy as treatment for borderline ovarian tumor. (SGO Abstract #168)

180. Significance of perioperative infectious disease in patients with ovarian cancer. (SGO Abstract #178)

185. The feasibility of mediastinal lymphadenectomy in the management of advanced and recurrent ovarian carcinoma. (SGO Abstract #183)

235. Incidence of venous thromboembolism after robotic surgery for gynecologic malignancy: Is dual prophylaxis necessary? (SGO Abstract #233)

286. Charlson’s index: A validation study to predict surgical adverse events in gynecologic oncology. (SGO Abstract #284)

288. Cost-effectiveness of extended postoperative venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in gynecologic pncology patients. (SGO Abstract #286)

302. Integration of and training for robot-assisted surgery in a gynecologic oncology fellowship program. (SGO Abstract #300)

303. Outcomes of patients with gynecologic malignancies undergoing video-assisted thorascopic surgery and pleurodesis for malignant pleural effusion. (SGO Abstract #301)

304. Perioperative and pathologic outcomes following robot-assisted laparoscopic versus abdominal management of ovarian cancer. (SGO Abstract #302)

307. Predictive risk factors for prolonged hospitalizations after gynecologic laparoscopic surgery. (SGO Abstract #305)

309. Robot-assisted surgery for gynecologic cancer: A systematic review. (SGO Abstract #307)

310. Robotic radical hysterectomy: Extent of tumor resection and operative outcomes compared with laparoscopy and exploratory laparotomy. (SGO Abstract #308)

315. Utilization of specialized postoperative services in a comprehensive surgical cytoreduction program. (SGO Abstract #313)

Genetic/Molecular Profiling

5. A 3’ UTR KRAS variant as a biomarker of poor outcome and chemotherapy resistance in ovarian cancer. (SGO Abstract #3)

15. XPC single-nucleotide polymorphisms correlate with prolonged progression-free survival in advanced ovarian cancer. (SGO Abstract #13)

16. Genomewide methylation analyses reveal a prominent role of HINF1 network genes, via hypomethylation, in ovarian clear cell carcinoma. (SGO Abstract #14)

49. Loss of ARID1A is a frequent event in clear cell and endometrioid ovarian cancers. (SGO Abstract #47)

53. Genetic variants in the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway as predictors of clinical response and survival in women with ovarian cancer. (SGO Abstract #51)

55. BAD apoptosis pathway expression and survival from cancer. (SGO Abstract #53)

59. Molecular profiling of advanced pelvic serous carcinoma associated with serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma. (SGO Abstract #57)

82. Biologic roles of tumor and endothelial delta-like ligand 4 in ovarian cancer. (SGO Abstract #80)

85. MicroRNA 101 inhibits ovarian cancer xenografts by relieving the chromatin-mediated transcriptional repression of p21waf1/cip1. (SGO Abstract #83)

102. Association between global DNA hypomethylation in leukocytes and risk of ovarian cancer. (SGO Abstract #100)

103. Cisplatin, carboplatin, and paclitaxel: Unique and common pathways that underlie ovarian cancer response. (SGO Abstract #101)

106. Comparison of mTOR and HIF pathway alterations in the clear cell carcinoma variant of kidney, ovary and endometrium. (SGO Abstract #104)

107. Concordant gene expression profiles in matched primary and recurrent serous ovarian cancers predict platinum response. (SGO Abstract #105)

111. Differential microRNA expression in cis-platinum-resistant versus -sensitive ovarian cancer cell lines. (SGO Abstract #109)

112. DNA methylation markers associated with serous ovarian cancer subtypes. (SGO Abstract #110)

118. MicroRNA and messenger RNA pathways associated with ovarian cancer cell sensitivity to topotecan, gemcitabine and doxorubicin. (SGO Abstract #116)

119. Molecular profiling of patients with curatively treated advanced serous ovarian carcinoma from The Cancer Genome Atlas. (SGO Abstract #117)

125. Proteomic analysis demonstrates that BRCA1-deficient epithelial ovarian cancer cell lines activate alternative pathways following exposure to cisplatin. (SGO Abstract #123)

132. The tumor suppressor KLF6, lost in a majority of ovarian cancer cases, represses VEGF expression levels. (SGO Abstract #130)

126. Quantitative PCR array identification of microRNA clusters associated with epithelial ovarian cancer chemoresistance. (SGO Abstract #124)

160. Genes functionally regulated by methylation in ovarian cancer are involved in cell proliferation, development and morphogenesis. (SGO Abstract #158)

181. Single-nucleotide polymorphism in DNA repair and drug resistance genes alone or in combination in epithelail ovarian cancer. (SGO Abstract #179)

278. Expression patterns of p53 and p21 cell cycle regulators and clinical outcome in women with pure gynecologic sarcomas. (SGO Abstract #276)

Immunotherapy

98. Ab-IL2 fusion proteins mediate NK cell immune synapse formation in epithelial ovarian cancer by polarizing CD25 to the target cell–effector cell interface. (SGO Abstract #96)

124. Proteasome inhibition increases death receptors and decreases major histocompatibility complex I expression: Pathways to exploit in natural killer cell immunotherapy. (SGO Abstract #122)

Medical Imaging

164. Impact of FDG-PET in suspected recurrent ovarian cancer and optimization of patient selection for cytoreductive surgery. (SGO Abstract #162)

294. The clinical and financial implications of MRI of pelvic masses. (SGO Abstract #292)

Preclinical Studies

11. A unique microRNA locus at 19q13.41 sensitizes epithelial ovarian cancers to chemotherapy. (SGO Abstract #9)

14. Common single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the BNC2, HOXD1 and MERIT40 regions contribute significantly to racial differences in ovarian cancer incidence. (SGO Abstract #12)

46. Development of a preclinical serous ovarian cancer mouse model. (SGO Abstract #44)

56. Examination of matched primary and recurrent ovarian cancer specimens supports the cancer stem cell hypothesis. (SGO Abstract #54)

58. Modeling of early events in serous carcinogenesis: Molecular prerequisites for transformation of fallopian tube epithelial cells. (SGO Abstract #56)

101. Antiproliferative activity of a phenolic extract from a native Chilean Amaranthaceae plant in drug-resistant ovarian cancer cell lines. (SGO Abstract #99)

115. Identification and characterization of CD44+/CD24–ovarian cancer stem cell properties and their correlation with survival. (SGO Abstract #113)

Preclinical Studies – Potential Therapeutic Targets

57. Hypoxia-mediated activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in ovarian cancer: A novel therapeutic strategy using HO-3867, a STAT3 inhibitor (and novel curcumin analog). (SGO Abstract #55)

61. The ubiquitin ligase EDD mediates platinum resistance and is a target for therapy in epithelial ovarian cancer. (SGO Abstract #59)

97. A novel hedgehog pathway smoothened inhibitor (BMS-833923) demonstrates in vitro synergy with carboplatin in ovarian cancer cells. (SGO Abstract #95)

100. AMPK activation mimics glucose deprivation and induces cytotoxicity in ovarian cancer cells. (SGO Abstract #98)

104. Clinical significance of vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) in the ovarian cancer microenvironment. (SGO Abstract #102)

105. Combined erbB/VEGFR blockade has improved anticancer activity over single-pathway inhibition in ovarian cancer in vivo. (SGO Abstract #103)

114. EZH2 expression correlates with increased angiogenesis in ovarian carcinoma. (SGO Abstract #112)

116. Induction of apoptosis in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells by G-1, a specific agonist of the G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor GPR30. (SGO Abstract #114)

120. Neuropilin-1 blockade in the tumor microenvironment reduces tumor growth. (SGO Abstract #118)

129. Targeting the hedgehog pathway reverses taxane resistance in ovarian cancer. (SGO Abstract #127)

121. Ovarian cancer lymph node metastases express unique cellular structure and adhesion genes. (SGO Abstract #119)

122. Overexpression of fibroblast growth factor 1 and fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 in high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma: Correlation with survival and implications for therapeutic targeting. (SGO Abstract #120)

131. The pattern of H3K56 acetylation expression in ovarian cancer. (SGO Abstract #129)

133. Thinking outside of the tumor: Targeting the ovarian cancer microenvironment. (SGO Abstract #131)

161. Horm-A domain-containing protein 1 (HORMAD1) and outcomes in patients with ovarian cancer. (SGO Abstract #159)

165. Influence of the novel histone deacetylase inhibitor panobinostat (LBH589) on the growth of ovarian cancer. (SGO Abstract #163)

166. Inhibition of stress-induced phosphoprotein 1 decreases proliferation of ovarian cancer cell lines. (SGO Abstract #164)

167. Insulin-like growth factor receptor 1 pathway signature correlates with adverse clinical outcome in ovarian cancer. (SGO Abstract #165)

230. Therapeutic synergy and resensitization of drug-resistant ovarian carcinoma to cisplatin by HO-3867. (SGO Abstract #228)

Palliative & Supportive Care

159. Factors associated with hospice use in ovarian cancer. (SGO Abstract #226)

190. Age-related preferences regarding end-of-life care discussions among gynecologic oncology patients. (SGO Abstract #188)

192. Palliative care education in gynecologic oncology: A survey of the fellows. (SGO Abstract #190)

Rare Ovarian Cancers

151. Carcinosarcoma of the ovary: A case–control study. (SGO Abstract #149)

Survival Data

80. Ten-year relative survival for epithelial ovarian cancer. (SGO Abstract #78)

83. Impact of beta blockers on epithelial ovarian cancer survival. (SGO Abstract #81)

176. Revisiting the issue of race-related outcomes in patients with stage IIIC papillary serous ovarian cancer who receive similar treatment. (SGO Abstract #174)

186. The impact of diabetes on survival in women with ovarian cancer. (SGO Abstract #184)

284. Survival following ovarian versus uterine carcinosarcoma. (SGO Abstract #282)

285. The unique natural history of mucinous tumors of the ovary. (SGO Abstract #283)

292. Stage IC ovarian cancer: Tumor rupture versus ovarian surface involvement. (SGO Abstract #290)

Survivorship

191. Menopausal symptoms and use of hormone replacement therapy: The gynecologic cancer survivors’ perspective. (SGO Abstract #189)

Other

4. From guidelines to the front line: Only a minority of the Medicare population with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer receive optimal therapy. (SGO Abstract #2)

32. Efficacy of influenza vaccination in women with ovarian cancer. (SGO Abstract #30)

91. Women with invasive gynecologic malignancies are more than 12 times as likely to commit suicide as are women in the general population. (SGO Abstract #89)

231. Attrition of first-time faculty in gynecologic oncology: Is there a difference between men and women? (SGO Abstract #229)

238. Relative impact of cost drivers on the increasing expense of inpatient gynecologic oncology care. (SGO Abstract #236)

Late-Breaking Abstracts

About Society of Gynecologic Oncologists (SGO)

The SGO is a national medical specialty organization of physicians and allied healthcare professionals who are trained in the comprehensive management of women with malignancies of the reproductive tract. Its purpose is to improve the care of women with gynecologic cancer by encouraging research, disseminating knowledge which will raise the standards of practice in the prevention and treatment of gynecologic malignancies, and cooperating with other organizations interested in women’s health care, oncology and related fields. The Society’s membership, totaling more than 1,400, is primarily comprised of gynecologic oncologists, as well as other related medical specialists including medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, nurses, social workers and pathologists. SGO members provide multidisciplinary cancer treatment including chemotherapy, radiation therapy, surgery and supportive care. More information on the SGO can be found at www.sgo.org.

About Gynecologic Oncologists

Gynecologic oncologists are physicians committed to the comprehensive treatment of women with cancer. After completing four years of medical school and four years of residency in obstetrics and gynecology, these physicians pursue an additional three to four years of training in gynecologic oncology through a rigorous fellowship program overseen by the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Gynecologic oncologists are not only trained to be skilled surgeons capable of performing wide-ranging cancer operations, but they are also trained in prescribing the appropriate chemotherapy for those conditions and/or radiation therapy when indicated. Frequently, gynecologic oncologists are involved in research studies and clinical trials that are aimed at finding more effective and less toxic treatments to further advance the field and improve cure rates.

Studies on outcomes from gynecologic cancers demonstrate that women treated by a gynecologic oncologist have a better likelihood of prolonged survival compared to care rendered by non-specialists. Due to their extensive training and expertise, gynecologic oncologists often serve as the “team captain” who coordinates all aspects of a woman’s cancer care and recovery. Gynecologic oncologists understand the impact of cancer and its treatments on all aspects of women’s lives including future childbearing, sexuality, physical and emotional well-being—and the impact cancer can have on the patient’s whole family.

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Novel Cancer-Targeting “Cornell Dot” Nanoparticle Approved for First-In-Human Clinical Trial

“Cornell Dots” — brightly glowing nanoparticles — may soon be used to light up cancer cells to aid in diagnosing and treating cancer. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the first clinical trial in humans of the new technology. It is the first time the FDA has approved using an inorganic material in the same fashion as a drug in humans.

“Cornell Dots” (or “C dots”) — brightly glowing nanoparticles — may soon be used to light up cancer cells to aid in diagnosing and treating cancer. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the first clinical trial in humans of the new technology. It is the first time the FDA has approved using an inorganic material in the same fashion as a drug in humans.

Michelle Bradbury, M.D., Ph.D., Clinician-Scientist, Neuroradiology Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center; Assistant Professor, Radiology, Weill Cornell Medical College; Lead Study Investigator

Researchers at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center’s Nanotechnology Center, along with collaborators at Cornell University and Hybrid Silica Technologies, have received approval for their first Investigational New Drug Application (IND) from the FDA for an ultrasmall silica inorganic nanoparticle platform for targeted molecular imaging of cancer, which may be useful for cancer treatment in the future. Center researchers are about to launch their first-in-human clinical trial in melanoma patients using this first-of-its-kind inorganic nanoparticle to be approved as a drug. “This is a very exciting and important first step for this new particle technology that we hope will ultimately lead to significant improvements in patient outcomes and prognoses for a number of different cancers,” said Michelle Bradbury, M.D., Ph.D., a clinician-scientist on Memorial Sloan-Kettering’s Neuroradiology Service and an assistant professor of radiology at Weill Cornell Medical College, who is the lead investigator of the study, along with Snehal Patel, M.D., a surgeon on Memorial Sloan-Kettering’s Head and Neck Service, who is a co-principal investigator.

“This is a very exciting and important first step for this new particle technology that we hope will ultimately lead to significant improvements in patient outcomes and prognoses for a number of different cancers.”

— Michelle Bradbury, M.D., Ph.D., lead investigator of the study and clinician-scientist on Memorial Sloan-Kettering’s Neuroradiology Service and an assistant professor of radiology at Weill Cornell Medical College

C dots were initially developed as optical probes at Cornell University, Ithaca, by Ulrich Wiesner, Ph.D., a professor of materials science and engineering who, along with Hybrid Silica Technologies, the supplier of C dots, has spent the past eight years precisely engineering these particles. C dots are silica spheres less than 8 nanometers in diameter that enclose several dye molecules. (A nanometer is one-billionth of a meter, about the length of three atoms in a row.) The silica shell, essentially glass, is chemically inert and small enough to pass through the body and out in the urine. For clinical applications, the dots are coated with polyethylene glycol so the body will not recognize them as foreign substances.

C dots were subsequently modified at Memorial Sloan-Kettering for use in PET (positron emission tomography) imaging. C dots are tiny silica spheres that contain dye that glows three times more brightly than simple free dyes when excited by light of a specific wavelength. C dots can “light up” cancer cells, and act as tumor tracers for tracking the movement of cells and assisting in the optical diagnosis of tumors near the skin surface. The attachment of a radioactive label produces a new generation of multimodal (PET-optical) particle probes that additionally enable deeper detection, imaging, and monitoring of drug delivery using three-dimensional PET techniques.

Ulrich Wiesner, Ph.D. (left), a Cornell University Professor of Materials Science & Engineering, works with graduate students Jennifer Drewes & Kai Ma to characterize the size & brightness of C dots in their Bard Hall lab. (Photo: Jason Koski/University Photography)

C dots can be tailored to any particle size. Previous imaging experiments in mice conducted by the Memorial Sloan-Kettering team showed that particles of a very small size (in the 5 to 7 nanometer range) could be retained in the bloodstream and efficiently cleared through the kidneys after applying a neutral surface coat. More recently, the research team molecularly customized C dots to create a new particle platform, or probe, that can target surface receptors or other molecules expressed on tumor surfaces and that can be cleared through the kidneys.

Using PET scans, C dots can be imaged to evaluate various biological properties of the tumors, including tumor accumulation, spread of metastatic disease to lymph nodes and distant organs, and treatment response to therapy. The information gained from imaging tumors targeted with this multimodal platform may also assist physicians in defining tumor borders for surgery, and improving real-time visualization of small vascular beds, anatomic channels, and neural structures during surgery.

The purpose of this trial is to evaluate the distribution, tissue, uptake, and safety of the particles in humans by PET imaging. This study will provide data that will serve as a baseline to guide the design of future surgical and oncologic applications in the clinic. “The use of PET imaging is an ideal imaging technology for sensitively monitoring very small doses of this new particle probe in first-in-human trials,” added Steven Larson, M.D., Chief of Memorial Sloan-Kettering’s Nuclear Medicine Service.

Memorial Sloan-Kettering nanochemist Oula Penate Medina, Ph.D., notes that “this is an important trial in that it will help to answer a number of key questions regarding future potential applications of this multimodal system. Once the door has been opened, new and emerging fields, such as targeted drug delivery, can be investigated. We expect that these particles can be adapted for multiple clinical uses, including the early diagnosis and treatment of various cancers, as well as for sensing changes in the microenvironment.”

“This clinical trial is the culmination of a longstanding collaborative effort with our colleagues at Cornell and Hybrid Silica Technologies, as well as a testament to our own institutional colleagues here at the Center,” Dr. Bradbury said. “With the support of many, in particular the Office of Clinical Research, we’ve pushed to translate the C dots from a laboratory idea to our first FDA IND-approved inorganic nanomedicine drug product to be tested in the clinic,” Dr. Bradbury said.

The work was funded in part by the Clinical and Translational Science Center, Weill Cornell Medical College, the Cornell Nanobiology Center, and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Small-Animal Imaging Research Program (SAIRP). In addition to Drs. Bradbury, Penante-Medina, Larson, Patel, and Wiesner, the following Memorial Sloan-Kettering investigators contributed to and/or supported this work: Pat Zanzonico, Ph.D.; Heiko Schöder, M.D.; Elisa De Stanchina, Ph.D.; Hedvig Hricak, M.D., Ph.D., Chair of the Department of Radiology; as well as Hooisweng Ow, Ph.D., of Hybrid Silica Technologies, Inc.; Memorial Sloan-Kettering’s Office of Clinical Research; and the Cyclotron Core.

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