Women of Diverse Ethnic Ancestry Have Similar Risk of Carrying BRCA Mutations as Those With Western European Ancestry

” …The study, performed by researchers at Philadelphia’s Fox Chase Cancer Center and Myriad Genetics, Inc., analyzed the prevalence of BRCA1/BRCA2 gene mutations in patients of different ethnicities at risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer. The study included test results of 46,276 women during the ten-year period from 1996 to 2006. Study subjects encompassed a broad, diverse ethnic group, including individuals of European, Latin American, African, Asian and Native American ancestries. … Results of the study showed that BRCA disease-causing mutations were identified in 5,780 women tested (12.5%) across all ethnic populations. Importantly, the study demonstrated that individuals of African and Latin American ancestry had as great a risk in having BRCA mutations as women with western European ancestry, when controlled for the level of personal and family history of breast and ovarian cancer. …”

“New Study Published in CANCER Supports Use of BRACAnalysis Testing Across Broad Ethnic Populations

Women of Asian, African and Latin American Ancestry Had Similar Risk of Carrying BRCA Mutations as Those With Western European Ancestry

SALT LAKE CITY, UT, Apr 30, 2009 (MARKET WIRE via COMTEX News Network) — Myriad Genetics, Inc. (NASDAQ: MYGN) announced today that an article entitled ‘BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations in Women of Different Ethnicities Undergoing Testing for Hereditary Breast-Ovarian Cancer‘ will appear in the May 15, 2009 issue of the journal CANCER.  The study demonstrates that BRACAnalysis(R) testing of at-risk women across diverse ethnicities helps identify individuals who may benefit from improved surveillance, medical and surgical strategies to reduce their hereditary cancer risks.

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Gregory C. Critchfield, M.D., M.S., President, Myriad Genetic Laboratories

‘This study, the largest of its kind, shows convincingly that strong family or personal history of breast or ovarian cancer is associated with a high prevalence of BRCA mutations — irrespective of one’s ethnic heritage,’ stated Gregory C. Critchfield, M.D., M.S., President of Myriad Genetic Laboratories.

The association between ethnicity and the risk of BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations has not been well understood in women of non-European ancestry. This study provides important information for women of Asian, African, Latin American and Native American ancestry that may impact breast cancer [and ovarian cancer] prevention and treatment efforts among women in these populations. The study, performed by researchers at Philadelphia’s Fox Chase Cancer Center and Myriad Genetics, Inc., analyzed the prevalence of BRCA1/BRCA2 gene mutations in patients of different ethnicities at risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer. The study included test results of 46,276 women during the ten-year period from 1996 to 2006. Study subjects encompassed a broad, diverse ethnic group, including individuals of European, Latin American, African, Asian and Native American ancestries. To date, this work represents the largest group of patients tested for BRCA mutations reported in the literature. All testing was performed at Myriad Genetics, Inc.

Results of the study showed that BRCA disease-causing mutations were identified in 5,780 women tested (12.5%) across all ethnic populations. Importantly, the study demonstrated that individuals of African and Latin American ancestry had as great a risk in having BRCA mutations as women with western European ancestry, when controlled for the level of personal and family history of breast and ovarian cancer.

Professional medical society guidelines, such as the American Society of Clinical Oncologists (ASCO), the Society of Gynecologic Oncologists (SGO), and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), articulate risk factors for BRCA gene mutations, which include, among others, breast cancer occurring before age 50, personal or family history of ovarian cancer at any age, personal or family history of male breast cancer, Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry with breast cancer at any age, or the presence of a known BRCA mutation in the family.

About BRACAnalysis(R)

BRACAnalysis(R) is a comprehensive analysis of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes for assessing a woman’s risk for breast and ovarian cancer. A woman who tests positive with the BRACAnalysis(R) test has, on average, an 82% lifetime risk of developing breast cancer during her lifetime and a 44% risk of developing ovarian cancer. BRACAnalysis(R) provides important information that the Company believes will help the patient and her physician make better informed lifestyle, surveillance, preventive medication and treatment decisions. As published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, researchers have shown that pre-symptomatic individuals who have a high risk of developing breast cancer can reduce their risk by approximately 50% with appropriate preventive therapies. Additionally, as published in the New England Journal of Medicine, researchers have shown that pre-symptomatic individuals who carry gene mutations can lower their risk of developing ovarian cancer by approximately 60% with appropriate preventive therapies.

For more information about BRACAnalysis(R), please call 1-800-4-MYRIAD, or visit www.myriadtests.com.

About Myriad Genetics

Myriad Genetics, Inc. is a leading healthcare company focused on the development and marketing of novel molecular diagnostic and therapeutic products. Myriad’s news and other information are available on the Company’s Web site at www.myriad.com.

Myriad, the Myriad logo, BRACAnalysis, Colaris, Colaris AP, Melaris, TheraGuide, Prezeon, OnDose, Azixa and Vivecon are trademarks or registered trademarks of Myriad Genetics, Inc. in the United States and foreign countries. MYGN-G”

Sources

Related InformationCLICK HERE to review all Libby’s H*O*P*E*™ postings relating to BRCA gene mutations.

Tumor-Promoting Protein COX-2 Is The Target Of First Joint Symposium Between AACR & ASCO

An inflammatory protein implicated in a variety of cancers is the target of the first joint symposium between the nation’s two premier cancer research organizations.  The presidents of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) and the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) organized the session focused on the COX-2 enzyme and cancer treatment Monday afternoon — April 20, 2:30-4:30 p.m., in rooms 205-207 of the Colorado Convention Center — at the AACR’s 100th Annual Meeting 2009 in Denver.  A similar symposium on new molecular targets will be conducted at ASCO’s annual meeting in May 29- June 2 in Orlando.  COX-2 is best known as a target for preventing dangerous polyps that lead to colorectal cancer, but it is also advancing as a target for treatment of many solid tumors. …

“Leading cancer organizations team up on tumor-promoting protein – AACR and ASCO begin joint symposia at annual meetings with focus on COX-2

An inflammatory protein implicated in a variety of cancers is the target of the first joint symposium between the nation’s two premier cancer research organizations.

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Raymond DuBois, M.D., Ph.D., President, AACR; Provost and Executive Vice President, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

The presidents of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) and the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) organized the session focused on the COX-2 enzyme and cancer treatment Monday afternoon — April 20, 2:30-4:30 p.m., in rooms 205-207 of the Colorado Convention Center — at the AACR’s 100th Annual Meeting 2009 in Denver. A similar symposium on new molecular targets will be conducted at ASCO’s annual meeting in May 29- June 2 in Orlando.

COX-2 is best known as a target for preventing dangerous polyps that lead to colorectal cancer, but it is also advancing as a target for treatment of many solid tumors.

‘Our symposium is timely because we are starting to see data from Phase II and Phase III clinical trials about COX-2 inhibition following post-surgical chemotherapy in colon cancer patients,’ said Raymond DuBois, M.D., Ph.D., president of AACR and provost and executive vice president at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center.

‘There’s been a great deal of preclinical and translational research addressing COX-2 overexpression in tumors and its role in cancer growth and survival. In prevention, inhibiting this enzyme reduces the number of high-risk precancerous polyps by 66 percent,’ DuBois said. ‘The time is ripe to combine basic science and clinical expertise to advance the therapeutic potential of this approach.’

Joint efforts are critical to the development of new approaches against cancer, said ASCO President Richard L. Schilsky, M.D., professor of medicine at the University of Chicago Medical Center.

‘The development of targeted therapies for cancer prevention and treatment requires the close collaboration and combined resources of basic scientists and clinical investigators,’ Schilsky said. ‘The success of targeted therapy for cancer depends first and foremost on a comprehensive understanding of the biology of the drug target coupled with a robust assay to assess target inhibition and a drug that hits the target. With these ingredients in place, clinical trials can be designed to assess the impact of treatment in the population most likely to benefit.’

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Richard L. Schilsky, M.D., President, ASCO; Associate Dean for Clinical Research, Professor of Medicine at the University of Chicago Medical Center.

‘The AACR/ASCO Symposium illustrates these core principles and demonstrates that continued progress against cancer requires the partnership of all investigators and practitioners represented by these two great organizations,’ Schilsky said.

The idea for joint symposia at each organization’s annual meeting has been discussed for years and was advanced by immediate past presidents William Hait, M.D., Ph.D., of AACR and Nancy Davidson, M.D., of ASCO.

DuBois and Schilsky co-chair the symposium. Scheduled presentations are:

  • COX-2 and Cancer Biology by DuBois, who discovered the enzyme’s overexpression in tumors.
  • Overview of COX-2 as a Target for Cancer Treatment, by Schilsky.

*          *          *

AACR is the world’s oldest and largest professional organization dedicated to advancing cancer research. ASCO is the world’s leading professional organization representing physicians who care for people with cancer. Many scientists and physicians are members of both organizations.”

Source: Leading Cancer Organizations Team Up on Tumor-Promoting Protein – AACR and ASCO begin joint symposia at annual meetings with focus on COX-2, M.D. Anderson News Release, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, April 17, 2009.

Comment:  The relationship between ovarian cancer and COX-2 remains unclear.  Some in vitro and in vivo studies make a connection between ovarian cancer and COX-2, while others suggest that COX-1 is more relevant to current ovarian cancer research.  It is an area that warrants further investigation.

Recent Studies Re Ovarian Cancer and COX-2:

NOV-002 and Carboplatin Slow Disease Progression of Platinum Drug Resistant Ovarian Cancer

Novelos Therapeutics, Inc. (OTCBB: NVLT), a biopharmaceutical company focused on the development of therapeutics to treat cancer and hepatitis, today announced continued encouraging results in an ongoing Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center and Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center (DF/HCC) Phase 2 trial of NOV-002 in combination with carboplatin in platinum-resistant ovarian cancer patients. Fifteen patients have now been enrolled and, to date, 60% (9) have had slower than expected disease progression. NOV-002 was well-tolerated, further extending the excellent safety profile NOV-002 has demonstrated in previous studies. Detailed results of this trial will be presented as a poster at the 2008 annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) taking place May 30 – June 3 in Chicago, Illinois.

‘I am encouraged by these results in platinum-resistant ovarian cancer, with NOV-002 (in combination with carboplatin) apparently slowing disease progression in over half of the treated patients. Most women who have failed three lines of chemotherapy would be expected to progress in about eight weeks. I am excited to present the trial results at ASCO,’ said Dr. Carolyn Krasner, medical oncologist at the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center and the Principal Investigator. ‘We look forward to working closely with Dr. Krasner, the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Dana-Farber/Harvard and other institutions on designing and implementing a larger NOV-002 trial for this indication,’ said Harry Palmin, President and CEO of Novelos. ‘Our objective is to commence the next Phase 2 trial in platinum-resistant ovarian cancer in early 2009.’

According to the American Cancer Society, in 2007 approximately 22,000 U.S. women were diagnosed with ovarian cancer and 15,000 women were expected to die from it. There is a lack of effective treatment, particularly in the case of platinum-resistant patients. Once a woman’s ovarian cancer is defined as platinum-resistant the chance of having a partial or complete response to further platinum therapy is typically less than 10% and only 10-20% with other available agents. Thus, there is a major unmet medical need for this indication. …”

[Source: “Novelos Therapeutics Announces Continued Encouraging Results in Ongoing Phase 2 Ovarian Cancer Trial at Dan-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center;” Novelos Therapeutics, Inc. Press Release dated March 31, 2008.]