2008 ASCO Annual Meeting Abtracts Highlight Several Drugs That Show Promise Against Drug Resistant Ovarian Cancer

There were several drugs highlighted in clinical trial abstracts presented at the 2008 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting that demonstrated varying degrees of effectiveness against drug resistant (i.e., recurrence within 6 to 12 months after completion of first line treatment) and/or drug refractory (i.e., recurrence within 6 months after completion of first line treatment) ovarian cancer. By “effectiveness,” we mean generally that the drug or drug combination produced a complete response, partial response, and/or disease stabilization (and in a few cases, a significant drop in the CA-125 tumor marker) in ovarian cancer tumors. To better understand how to intrepret a medical study abstract, click here. The 2008 ASCO Annual Meeting was held in Chicago, Illinois on May 30 – June 3, 2008.

A list of the drugs/drug combinations is provided below. Any drug covered in depth through an earlier H*O*P*E*™ weblog post is noted. We also included 2008 ASCO Annual Meeting abstracts that provide “solid tumor” clinical trial results with respect to studies that enrolled patients with ovarian cancer tumors. When evaluating the potential enrollment in a clinical trial at various treatment points, an ovarian cancer survivor should evaluate trials dedicated to ovarian cancer patients in entirety, as well as general “solid tumor” trials that allow enrollment of ovarian cancer patients. Generally, a patient should give first priority to dedicated ovarian cancer trials and use the solid tumor trials as a “backup” to the ovarian cancer trials. All questions regarding the priority assigned to, or proper sequencing of, clinical trials should be discussed in detail with your doctor(s). Treatment priority and sequencing issues arise, for example, when enrollment in one clinical trial potentially disqualifies the patient for a subsequent second clinical trial based upon the protocol (i.e., inclusion/exclusion criteria) of the second trial. This example assumes that both clinical trials are currently enrolling patients when trial enrollment is being evaluated by you and your doctor.

Abbreviation Legend:

ABSTR=2008 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting Abtract; ASCO=American Society of Clinical Oncology; CA-125=cancer antigen 125; CEA=Carcinoembryonic Antigen (Tumor Marker); CR=Complete Response; CT=Computed Tomography

CTC=Common Toxicity Criteria; DCE-MRI=Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging; DLT=Dose Limiting Toxicity; DP=Disease Progression; EOC=Epithelial Ovarian Cancer; G=Grade of Adverse Drug Effect;

GCIG=Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup; GOGGynecologic Oncology Group; MTD=Maximum Tolerable Dose; mg/m²=milligrams per metre squared; NCI=National Cancer Institute; OR=Objective Response; OS=Overall Survival;

PET=Positron Emission Tomography Scanning; PK=Pharmacokinetics; PO=Oral Administration; PR=Partial Response; PFS=Progression Free Survival; RECIST=Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors; RR=Response Rate; SD=Stable Disease

SNS-595 (Voreloxin®):

NOV-002 & Carboplatin (Paraplatin®):

  • NOV-002 plus carboplatin in platinum-resistant ovarian cancer (2008 ASCO Abstract #5593). Patients were heavily pretreated with 11/15 patients having received 3 prior [treatment] lines. Toxicity was mild-moderate with no G4 toxicity. There was no febrile neutropenia. The most common toxicities were nausea and fatigue, as well as abdominal pain and bowel obstruction thought to be related to underlying disease. To date, there is 1 patient with PR, 7 patients with SD and 5 patients with PD, with 1 patient off-trial for patient discretion. PFS is 14 weeks. Patients tolerated this regimen extremely well, with most toxicity attributable to carboplatin alone. Conclusion: The PFS was longer than expected, with a significant proportion of these platinum resistant patients achieving clinical benefit with prolonged stable disease. [61% disease control (CR+PR+SD) rate]

Picoplatin & Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin (Doxil®):

  • Final results of a phase I study of picoplatin and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin [e.g. Doxil™] in advanced solid tumor malignancies (2008 ASCO Annual Mtg. Abstr. #2568 ): Picoplatin is a novel, sterically hindered platinum(II) complex designed to circumvent mechanisms of platinum resistance. Given the single agent activity seen in multiple tumor types, we conducted a phase I study of picoplatin in combination with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) in patients with advanced solid tumors. The Phase 1 trial enrolled 16 patients with advanced solid tumors who had received up to three prior regimens for metastatic disease. Patients were administered picoplatin followed by liposomal doxorubicin on day one of a 28-day cycle. Four dose levels of picoplatin and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin were tested: 100/20, 100/30, 100/40 and 120/40 (all mg/m2). A total of 62 courses of treatment were delivered to 16 patients with a median number of four cycles per patient. A total of 12 patients were evaluable for response. One patient experienced a CR (primary peritoneal cancer) and four experienced a PR (including three of five patients with ovarian cancer). Hematologic and non-hematologic toxicity were mild. Conclusion: This study suggests that picoplatin and liposomal doxorubicin is an active combination with promising results and can be given at standard dose levels with a minimal increase in toxicity. [41% disease control (CR+PR+SD) rate among evaluable patients]

Weekly Topotecan (Hycamtin™) Monotherapy:

  • Phase II study of weekly topotecan in recurrent ovarian cancer: duration of response based on a prolonged follow-up (ASCO Annual Mtg. Abstr. #16549). Nineteen patients (median age 52 yrs, range 45-72) with EOC who progressed after 3 (11/19 patients = 57.9%), 4 (7/19 patients= 36.8%) or 5 (1/19 patients= 5.3%) previous lines of chemotherapy were treated with Topotecan at the dose of 2.0 mg/m2 via a 30-minute intravenous infusion once every week until disease progression, unacceptable toxicity or when a stability of disease was reached. Results: All patients were evaluable for toxicity and clinical response. 16/19 patients enrolled (84.2%) had stage III-IV disease. Median number of chemotherapy cycles was 7 (range 3 – 12). A total of 107 cycles were administered. Dose reduction was necessary for 13% of the cycles. Main toxicities included anemia (G1-G2=57.9%), leucopenia (G1-G2=15.8%), thrombocytopenia (G1-G2=10.5%) and asthenia (20%). No one showed a CR, while 5/19 patients experienced a PR (26.4%), 6/19 patients experienced SD (31.5%), and 8/19 patients (42.1%) experienced DP. The median PFS was 12 weeks in patients with PR; SD was maintained for a median time of 14 weeks. Conclusion: The rate of patients with ongoing stable disease (31.5%) suggests that the clinical benefit of weekly topotecan may be expected also in patients with no other viable therapeutic options. [57% disease control (CR+PR+SD) rate among evaluable patients]

Azacitidine & Carboplatin:

Combretastatin A4 Phosphate (Zybrestat™) and Bevacizumab (Avastin™):

BSI-201:

Belinostat (PXD101):

SU11248/Sunitinib (Sutent®):

AZD2281 (KU-0059436):

  • AZD2281, a PARP (poly ADP-ribose polymerase) inhibitor with single agent anticancer activity in patients with BRCA deficient ovarian cancer: Results from a phase I study (2008 ASCO Annual Mtg. Abstr. #5510) Thirty-two patients with BRCA-deficient ovarian cancer (i.e., patients with BRCA gene mutations) the majority of whom were platinum resistant/refractory are so far evaluable for response. All evaluable patients had either received treatment for at least 8 weeks (2 cycles) or progressed prior to completion of 2 cycles. Fourteen patients have achieved PR, 13 patients meeting GCIG- CA125 criteria and 10 patients meeting RECIST criteria. Of the responders, 1 patient has been on drug > 56 weeks whilst 7 patients have maintained responses for > 24 weeks. SD was seen in an additional 8 patients, 7 of whom continue on drug and 3 patients had SD > 16 weeks. Responses were seen at all dose levels from 100mg bd and above. Conclusion: AZD2281 is well tolerated and has demonstrated compelling activity in patients with BRCA deficient ovarian cancer. Responses were seen in all patient groups including platinum resistant disease. Updated efficacy data, together with a correlation of potential predictive factors including platinum free interval will be presented on a total planned cohort of 46 patients with BRCA-deficient ovarian cancer. A randomised study in BRCA-deficient ovarian cancer has been planned. [68% disease control (CR+PR+SD) rate among evaluable patients]

Gemcitibine (Gemzar™) & Epirubicin (Ellence™):

Belinostat/PXD101, Carboplatin (Paraplatin®) & Paclitaxel (Taxol™):

Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin (Doxil®) & Gemcitabine (Gemzar®):

Pemetrexed/LY231514 (Altima®):

Sorafenib (Nexavar™):

  • Phase II trial of sorafenib in persistent or recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) or primary peritoneal cancer (PPC): A Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) study (2008 ASCO Annual Mtg. Abstr. #5537). Sorafenib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting raf and other receptor kinases (VEGF-R, PDGF-R, Flt3, c-KIT). Sorafenib may have anti-angiogenic activity through inhibition of VEGF-R. This phase II study was conducted to assess the activity and tolerability of sorafenib in patients with recurrent EOC. Methods: This was an open label multi-institutional phase II study …. Eligible patients had persistent or recurrent EOC/PPC after 1-2 prior cytotoxic regimens, measurable or detectable (e.g. by CA125) disease, and GOG performance status < 2. Patients were required to have progressed within 12 months of completing platinum based therapy. Treatment consisted of sorafenib 400 mg orally bid until disease progression or prohibitive toxicity. Primary endpoints were PFS at 6 months and toxicity by NCI criteria. Secondary endpoints were tumor response and duration of PFS/OS. Results: 73 patients were enrolled from 10/04 to 5/07 and as of 12/2007, 68 patients are evaluable (2 ineligible and 3 too early) for toxicity. Median age was 60 (range 33-80) years and prior treatment consisted of 1 regimen in 40 patients and 2 regimens in 28 patients. Significant G3 and G4 toxicities included: rash (12 patients), metabolic (10 patients), gastrointestinal (3 patients), cardiovascular (2 patients), and pulmonary (2 patients). No treatment related deaths were recorded. Only patients with measurable disease were used to assess efficacy. Among the 59 patients with measurable disease, 12 survived PFS at least 6 months. Three patients are yet to be determined. Two patients had PR; 20 had SD; 30 had DP, and 7 could not have their tumor assessed. Conclusions: Preliminary results suggest that sorafenib is tolerated in patients with recurrent EOC with dermatologic and metabolic abnormalities being the most common toxicities. Efficacy data is expected to reach maturity and be analyzed in the spring of 2007, and comprehensive results will be presented. [42% disease control (CR+PR+SD) rate among evaluable patients]

Topotecan (Hycamtin™) & Bevacizumab (Avastin™):

  • Phase II prospective study of weekly topotecan and bevacizumab in platinum refractory ovarian cancer or peritoneal cancer (OC) (2008 ASCO Annual Mtg. Abstr. #5551). Patients (pts) with platinum refractory OC have limited treatment options. Bevacizumab, an anti-angiogenesis agent has demonstrated efficacy in recurrent ovarian cancer. Bevacizumab combined with chemotherapy in other solid tumors has improved efficacy compared with bevacizumab or chemotherapy alone. Topotecan, an active drug in recurrent OC has been used in a weekly fashion with less toxicity and more acceptability than a standard 5 day regimen. Topotecan and bevacizumab have non-overlapping toxicities. We studied the efficacy and tolerability of weekly topotecan and bevacizumab in patients with platinum refractory OC. Methods: The primary objectives of this study were to evaluate PFS, OS, OR rate and toxicity of this combination regimen. Eligible pts included those with platinum refractory OC (recurrence < 6 months of platinum therapy) who had received a maximum of 2 prior chemotherapy regimens. Results: Twenty-two pts have been enrolled to date, with 11 pts remaining on study and 18 now evaluable. Best responses for the 18 evaluable pts were: 22.2% PR (n=4), 27.8% SD (n=5), and 50% DP (n=9). Eleven pts went off study due to DP (based on CT scan RECIST criteria [n=6] or general deterioration and/or bowel obstruction [n=5]). Median duration on study for the 18 evaluable pts was 15 wks (range 5-63 weeks). Four pts have had PFS >5 months. The 18 evaluable pts received a total of 91 treatment cycles. No pt went off study due to treatment related toxicity or suffered a bowel perforation. Conclusions: Combination bevacizumab and topotecan administered in a weekly fashion demonstrate good activity in platinum refractory OC with acceptable toxicity. G3-G4 Hematologic or Hypertensive Toxicities. [50% disease control (CR+PR+SD) rate among evaluable patients]

Lapatinib (Tykerb™), Carboplatin (Paraplatin®) & Paclitaxel (Taxol™):

  • Phase I/II lapatinib plus carboplatin and paclitaxel in stage III or IV relapsed ovarian cancer patients (2008 ASCO Annual Mtg. Abstr. #5556). The purpose of this study was to establish the MTD and evaluate DLTs and response to therapy of combination therapy with carboplatin/paclitaxel and lapatinib, an oral dual tyrosine kinase inhibitor of both ErbB1 and ErbB2, in Stage III /IV relapsed ovarian cancer. Methods: This was an open-label, multicenter, phase I/II study of carboplatin/paclitaxel in combination with single agent lapatinib in Stage III/IV relapsed ovarian cancer patients. Measurable disease, adequate organ function and ECOG performance status of 0-2 were required. Results: 25 ovarian cancer patients are enrolled and four are too early to be evaluable. The median age is 57 (range 39-81). The median number of prior therapeutic regimens is 4 (range 1-10). GI toxicities were primarily < grade 2 and were successfully treated with aggressive bowel management. 10 patients (pts) experienced G3 toxicities. 4 pts- leukopenia, 2 pts-neutropenia, 2 pts-hyperglycemia, 2 pts-allergic reactions to carboplatin, 1 pt-thrombocytopenia, 1 pt-lymphopenia, 1 pt-hypokalemia, 1 pt-nausea, 1 pt-diarrhea, 1 pt-bowel obstruction. Response to therapy to date is: CR=21%, PR=29%, SD=29%, PD=21%. Two patients who were in complete remission both stopped IV chemotherapy and were maintained only with lapatinib. One is still in remission after six months and one relapsed. Conclusions: Lapatinib, an oral targeted molecular therapy which inhibits both EGFR 1 and 2 tyrosine kinase activity, can be safely administered with a weekly regimen of carboplatin and paclitaxel in heavily pretreated, ovarian cancer patients. The high response rates seen warrant further investigation. [79% disease control (CR+PR+SD) rate among evaluable patients]

Ifomide, Epirubicin, & Cisplatin:

NKTR-102 (Pegylated irinotecan):

  • Phase I dose finding and pharmacokinetic study of NKTR-102 (PEGylated irinotecan): Early evidence of anti-tumor activity (2008 ASCO Annual Mtg. Abstr. #13518 ). NKTR-102 is a novel pegylated form of irinotecan with superior efficacy against a range of xenografts compared with irinotecan. Sustained tumor inhibition is associated with increased SN38 exposure. A phase I trial of NKTR-102 was conducted to establish the MTD and to characterize safety and PK in patients (pts) with refractory solid tumors. No CTC Grade 4 toxicity was observed. G3 diarrhea was dose limiting. Other toxicities included transient uncomplicated G3 neutropenia and transient infusion related visual disturbance. PK data are available for 12 pts. Two partial responses were observed in pts with advanced cervical cancer and small cell lung cancer. Anti-tumor activity was seen in 4 other pts; ovarian: CA-125 decreased from 2557 to 518, Hodgkin’s disease: 28% radiologic improvement with symptomatic benefit, adrenocortical: cortisol levels normalized, metabolic response by PET, esophageal: CEA decreased from 35.5 to 13.6, metabolic response by PET. Conclusions: NKTR-102 shows early evidence of activity in a wide spectrum of tumors. Cumulative SN38 exposure is 1.2 to 6.5 fold higher than that predicted for irinotecan. Toxicity is manageable; diarrhea (not neutropenia) is dose limiting.

ON 01910.Na:

  • Phase I study of ON 01910.Na, a novel polo-like kinase 1 pathway modulator, administered as a weekly 24-hour continuous infusion in patients with advanced cancer (2008 ASCO Annual Mtg. Abstr. #2515). ON 01910.Na induces G2/M cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and cell death in a broad spectrum of cancer cells, but not in non-neoplastic cells. In vitro, cell killing is dependent on drug exposure time. Based on these preclinical findings, a weekly 24hr continuous infusion (CI) study to determine safety and MTD of ON 01910.Na was initiated. Methods: Patients with advanced cancers received ON 01910.Na as a weekly 24hr CI. Twenty-three pts (7:16 M:F, 45-80 yrs) have received ON 01910.Na. G2 toxicities (2-grade increase over baseline) included fatigue (3 pts) and anorexia (1 pt). Fatigue (11/23 pts) was the most common side effect, with no G3 or greater fatigue observed. Overall, three G3 events occurred, none of which were drug-related. The best response was a pt with advanced ovarian cancer who maintained stable disease for 36 wks of treatment. Conclusions: ON 01910.Na is well tolerated as a weekly 24h continuous infusion. In the dose range studied, the drug exhibited non-linear kinetics with rapid attainment of plasma concentrations that are cytotoxic to cancer cells in vitro, but have limited end-organ toxicity in vivo. Study data continues to accrue, and we expect to recommend a phase II dose shortly. Further analysis and combination phase I studies are planned.

BAY 73-4506:

  • Phase I study of BAY 73-4506, an inhibitor of oncogenic and angiogenic kinases, in patients with advanced solid tumors: Final results of a dose-escalation study (2008 ASCO Annual Mtg. Abstr. #2558 ). BAY 73-4506 is a potent tyrosine kinase inhibitor of receptor tyrosine kinases (VEGFR, PDGF, RET, KIT, FGFR) and serine/threonine kinases (raf and p38MAPK). In tumor xenograft models, BAY 73-4506 demonstrated a broad spectrum antitumor activity. Methods: This phase I study was a dose-escalation trial investigating the safety, PK, and pharmacodynamic (PD) profile of BAY 73-4506, given orally in 21 days on/7 days off cycles, until discontinuation due to toxicity or tumor progression. PK was assessed on days 1 and 21 of cycle 1. PD markers including DCE-MRI, soluble VEGFR-2 (sVEGFR-2) and VEGF plasma levels were assessed at each cycle. Tumor response was evaluated as per RECIST. Results: 52 patients (pts) with solid tumors and progressive disease were enrolled and treated with doses of 10 to 220 mg once daily. Frequent tumor types included colorectal cancer (CRC) (31%), malignant melanoma (10%), and ovarian cancer (10%). The median treatment duration was 49.5 days (min. 3, max. 609). Drug-related adverse events (AEs) of all grades reported in >20% of pts were hoarseness (54%), dermatological toxicities (50%; CTC G3-G4: 13%), mucositis (35%), diarrhea (25%; CTC 3: 2%), fatigue (23%; CTC 3: 2%), and hypertension (23%; CTC 3: 6%). Treatment-related AEs leading to dose reduction, interruption or discontinuation were hand foot skin reaction (15%), diarrhea (8%), and thrombopenia (6%). Of the 33 evaluable pts, 9% achieved a partial response (PR), 64% had stable disease (SD), at least 7 weeks after start of treatment, and 48% had SD or PR for more than 11 weeks. Conclusions: The recommended phase II dose for BAY 73-4506 is 160 mg daily, using the 21 days on/7 days off treatment schedule. Clinical activity (PR+SD) has been demonstrated in 73% of the evaluable pts. An extension cohort (dose level 160 mg) has been started.

Voreloxin (SNS-595) Produces 48% Disease Stabilization in Treatment Resistant Ovarian Cancer Patients

Voreloxin (at a 48 mg/m² dosage) demonstrates single agent activity in advanced platinum-resistant ovarian cancer patients (24 patients with stable disease (SD) ≥90 days, 1 patent with complete response (CR), 5 patients with partial response (PR)) as evidenced by a 48% overall disease control rate (i.e., SD + PR + CR). The results are impressive because the disease control response population includes patients with primary and secondary platinum drug resistance who have failed prior treatment with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil®, Caelyx®, Myocet®), gemcitabine (Gemzar®), topotecan (Hycamtin®), etoposide (Eposin®, Etopophos®, Vepesid®), bevacizumab (Avastin®), and/or other various experimental agents.

The H*O*P*E*™ weblog reported the early interim success of Voreloxin (formerly known as SNS-595) in Phase II clinical trial testing on March 15, 2008. Based upon an abstract presentation that will be made by Sunesis Pharmaceuticals today at the 2008 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting, the success of Voreloxin continues, despite the fact that many of the ovarian cancer patients participating in the trial experienced significant drug/treatment resistance prior to enrollment.

Specifically, Voreloxin (at a 48 mg/m² dosage) demonstrates single agent activity in advanced platinum-resistant ovarian cancer patients (24 patients with stable disease (SD) ≥90 days, 1 patent with complete response (CR), 5 patients with partial response (PR)) as evidenced by a 48% overall disease control rate (i.e., SD + PR + CR). The results are impressive because the disease control response population includes patients with primary and secondary platinum drug resistance who have failed prior treatment with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil®, Caelyx®, Myocet®), gemcitabine (Gemzar®), topotecan (Hycamtin®), etoposide (Eposin®, Etopophos®, Vepesid®), bevacizumab (Avastin®), and/or other various experimental agents. Approximately 79% of the patient population that experienced disease control with Voreloxin at a 48mg/m² dosage received between two to four prior lines of treatment. In addition, one patient who experienced a partial response to Voreloxin at the 48 mg/m² dosage had a tumor histology identified as clear cell ovarian cancer — an aggressive form of ovarian cancer that is generally resistant to traditional therapies. It appears that there are 11 clear cell ovarian cancer patients participating in the Voreloxin Phase II trial (i.e., 7 patients in the 48 mg/m² dosage arm, and 4 patients in the 60 mg/m² dosage arm); however, there are no specific results reported for these patients (other than the one partial responder) in the 2008 ASCO Annual Meeting abstract presentation data.

Due to the earlier success of Voreloxin prior to March 15th, the trial investigators enrolled 21 new patients into the Phase II trial for purposes of testing Voreloxin at a 60 mg/m² dosage. Because these newer patients only received two cycles of Voreloxin at the higher dosage to date, they were not evaluated officially for purposes of the 2008 ASCO Annual Meeting abstract presentation data. The grade 3/4 adverse effects of Voreloxin at both dosages are reported as relatively low, therefore, trial investigators incorporated a 75 mg/m² dosage escalation into the current Phase II trial. The investigators do not indicate how many patients (currently enrolled or newly recruited) will participate in the 75 mg/m² dosage arm. Currently, a total of 86 ovarian cancer patients are enrolled in the Voreloxin Phase II trial (65 patients in the 48 mg/m² dosage arm; 21 patients in the 60 mg/m² dosage arm).

[Sources: “A Phase 2 Trial of Voreloxin (Formerly SNS-595) in Women with Platinum-Resistant Epithelial Ovarian Cancer,” 2008 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting Presentation, May 31, 2008 (Adobe Reader PDF Document). See also, “A phase II trial of SNS-595 in women with platinum resistant epithelial ovarian cancer,” W. P. McGuire et. al., J Clin Oncol 26: 2008 (May 20 suppl; abstr 5582) (2008 ASCO Annual Mtg. Abstract); “A Phase 2 Open-Label, Multicenter Study of SNS-595 Injection in Patients With Platinum-Resistant Ovarian Cancer, National Cancer Institute ID# NCT00408603 (sets forth original Voreloxin (SNS-595) Phase II clinical trial protocol).

Updates:

2008 SGO Annual Meeting Ovarian Cancer Abstract Highlights

The Society of Gynecologic Oncologists (SGO) held its “Women’s Cancer” annual meeting on March 9-12th in Tampa, Florida. I have provided below links to several DG Dispatch and medpage Today news releases that summarize important SGO meeting abstracts and presentations:

SNS-595 Shows Promise For Platinum-Resistant Ovarian Cancer Patients

Sunesis Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (Nasdaq: SNSS), a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on the discovery, development and commercialization of novel small-molecule therapeutics, announced positive interim data from the company’s ongoing Phase 2 clinical trial of its lead product candidate, SNS-595, in platinum-resistant ovarian cancer patients.

In this Phase 2 clinical trial, single agent SNS-595 has demonstrated disease control (defined as stable disease, partial response or complete response) in 31 of 35 patients evaluable for best response using GOG-RECIST criteria. Of these 31 patients, one patient had a complete response, four patients had partial responses (two unconfirmed) and 26 patients had a best response of stable disease. All patients enrolled in the trial have previously failed treatment with platinum-containing regimens, and fourteen of the 35 patients have also failed prior treatment with doxorubicin HCl liposome injection (Doxil(R)). Both platinum-resistant and Doxil-resistant patients in the Phase 2 clinical trial have responded to SNS-595 therapy.

‘Recurrence rates among ovarian cancer patients remain high, and the majority of refractory patients are resistant to platinum-based therapies. Based on these interim data, SNS-595 appears to be a promising, active agent in a difficult-to-treat ovarian cancer patient population,’ said William P. McGuire, M.D., Medical Director of the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Cancer Institute at Franklin, and a lead investigator for the Phase 2 trial.

Among forty-five patients with sufficient follow-up to yield safety data, SNS-595 was generally well tolerated at a dose level of 48mg/m2 administered once every three weeks. The most common adverse events reported thus far include nausea, fatigue, vomiting and alopecia. There was a low rate of febrile neutropenia or other Grade 3/4 adverse events, and manageable Grade 1/2 nausea or vomiting.

Based on the indications of clinical activity and the acceptable tolerability profile demonstrated to date among this patient population, the dose of SNS-595 in this trial has been increased to 60 mg/m2 over twenty-eight days. Patient accrual at this dose level is ongoing.

‘We are pleased by the strong signal of activity emerging from our Phase 2 clinical trial of SNS-595 at the 48mg/m2 dose level. Based on the drug’s observed safety profile and recommendations from advisors, we are exploring a higher dose of SNS-595 in this trial. Enrollment has begun at 60 mg/m2 and we expect to enroll approximately 30 patients at this dose by the third quarter of this year,’ said Daniel C. Adelman, M.D., Senior Vice President, Development and Chief Medical Officer of Sunesis. ‘Enthusiasm for SNS-595 among our clinical investigators is growing and enrollment in this trial has been accelerating. We expect to present further data from this Phase 2 clinical trial this year.’

The interim clinical results are being presented in a poster, “A Phase 2 Trial of SNS-595 in Women with Platinum-Refractory Epithelial Ovarian Cancer” (Abstract # 290), at the 39th Annual Meeting on Women’s Cancer hosted by the Society of Gynecologic Oncologists (SGO) in Tampa, Fla. through March 12, 2008.”

About SNS-595

SNS-595 is a novel naphthyridine analog, structurally related to quinolones, a class of compounds which has not been used previously for the treatment of cancer. SNS-595 is a specific DNA intercalator and topoisomerase II poison, causing replication-dependent site-selective double strand DNA damage, irreversible G2 arrest and rapid apoptosis. In non-clinical evaluations, SNS-595 demonstrates broad and potent activity in xenograft, syngeneic and drug-resistant models. In addition to the Phase 2 clinical trial in ovarian cancer patients, SNS-595 is currently being evaluated in combination with cytarabine in a Phase 1b acute leukemia clinical trial. In clinical trials conducted to date, SNS-595 has been generally well tolerated and has shown objective responses in both solid and hematologic tumor types.”

Quoted Source: [“Sunesis Pharmaceuticals Reports Positive Interim Data for SNS-595 Single-Agent Activity in Platinum-Resistant Ovarian Cancer”, MedicalNewsToday.com, March 11, 2008. (Emphasis added by posting author)].

Updates: